Archive for October, 2010

The Geography of Open Source

The paper presents an empirical study of the geography of open source software development that looks at Github, a popular project hosting website. We show that developers are highly clustered and concentrated primarily in North America and Western and Northern Europe, though a substantial minority is present in other regions. Code contributions and attention show a strong local bias. Users in North America account for a larger share of received contributions than of contributions made. They also receive a disproportionate amount of attention.

.:takhteyev.org->

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 4th, 2010
at 12:35pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: web,development,education,open source

Comments: No comments


Pop over to USA today and find out how ignorant Americans are of other religions.A The results will knock your yarmulke off.

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 4th, 2010
at 9:28am by Black Ock


Categories: the column

Comments: No comments


TED: Carne Ross

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 3rd, 2010
at 8:05pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: ir

Comments: No comments


The Specialist vs. the Generalist

Entrepreneurs and people in general have to decide whether they should grow to become specialists in a dedicated field, or whether they should spread themselves and become generalists. I would like to argue that unless you would like to live in academia, or hope to one day present a TED talk, that becoming a generalist will increase your chances of being successful - especially as an entrepreneur.

It's important to keep in mind that just because you have opted to become a generalist, that being a specialist is not wrong and that you shouldn't associate yourself with them. On the contrary, you should know as many as you possibly can. Specialists are the individuals that drive innovation and progress in their various disciplines and therefore they will be the de facto go-to people for queries around their respective subjects. Specialists also have access to key people in their respective networks that could prove to be drivers of execution.

However, it's often better being the person who knows the people that know the important people in a network than it is being that very person. The reason for this is the opportunity cost of the specialization. To be in the significant percentile of importance, your time will have to be exclusively dedicated to a subject. This automatically means that your progress in the necessary, peripheral subjects of your endeavor will suffer, which could very well mean that your endeavor will fail because of it.

.:thegrinch.posterous.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 3rd, 2010
at 1:43pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: entrepreneurship

Comments: No comments


NINJAPAN BLOG vol.7

aaaaaaaaaaa

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaasaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaSaaSaaa
aaaaaaaaaaSaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaSaaaaaSaaaaaaa

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaSaaaaaaasaaaaaaaaa

LovePlus+ does fancy ‘augmented reality’ thing in Atami
aaSaaaaSaa

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaSaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
Saaaasaaaaaaaa

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaSaaaSaaaaaaaaaa

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaSaaaaaaSaaaaaaaaaaaaa
aaaaaaaaasaaaaaaSaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaSaaaaaaa

aaaaaaaaasassaSaaaaaaaaaaaaa

aaaaaaSaaaaaaaSaaaSaaaaaaaaasaaaaaaaaaaa

assaSaaaaSaaaaaSaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaSaa

aaaaaaaaSaaaSaa

aaaaaaaaSaassaaaSaaSaaaaaaSa…

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 2nd, 2010
at 10:50am by mnp

Tagged with


Categories: blogs

Comments: No comments


Cheryl Dunn’s "Everybody Street"

The photographer and filmmakerACheryl Dunn has been making pictures in the streets of New York for the past twenty years. She's drawn to street shooting because "it is pure and uncontrollable and it takes an intense commitment," she writes in an e-mail. "I feel it reveals a thread in humanity that is random and true and hard to capture." Twelve decades ago, when Alfred Stieglitz first took to the streets with a handheld 4 x 5 camera, he was driven by the same thrilling mix of difficulty and serendipity. "My picture 'Fifth Avenue, Winter' is the result of a three hours' stand during a fierce snow-storm on February 22nd, 1893, awaiting the proper moment," Stieglitz wrote in 1897. "My patience was duly rewarded. Of course, the result contained an element of chance, as I might have stood there for hours without succeeding in getting the desired pictures."

This fall, the Seaport Museum New York pays tribute to Stieglitz's New York work in a show fittingly titled "Alfred Stieglitz New York." To accompany the exhibit, the curators commissioned Dunn to make a new documentary about photographers who have used New York City street life as a major subject in their work. "I chose people who have an innate desire to walk the streets and take pictures that cannot be suppressed, and have done this for a long time," she writes. Here's a first look at the trailer for Dunn's film, "Everybody Street."

.:newyorker.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 1st, 2010
at 6:35pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: film

Comments: No comments


David Drake : Summer Luau Luv II

: Download Link :

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 1st, 2010
at 6:30pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: music

Comments: No comments


Reverse Sales : ToVieFor

YouTube Preview Image

.:toviefor.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 1st, 2010
at 6:12pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: clothes,business,design

Comments: No comments


Speed-Reading Techniques

I was a Bible college student when one of our chapels featured a guest speaker who taught us how to speed-read. At the time I didn't need the skill since most collateral reading assignments in my courses were under 500 pages, but I started practicing just for the fun of it - sort of like a private parlor game. However all that changed when I wound up in graduate school at Princeton Seminary and several Profs. expected me to read several thousand pages of collateral along with the five or six textbooks. That's when I got serious about speed reading. Here is the collection of what I practiced then, and picked up since. The first thing I had to do was toss away the reading myths I had held so long.

.:pianoer.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 1st, 2010
at 3:33pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: weaponry,diy,education

Comments: No comments