Archive for the ‘et cetera’ Category

My Ninja, Please! 6.28.11 : Foam Printer

As they say, carry on my ninjas.

YouTube Preview Image
email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: June 28th, 2011
at 5:34pm by mnp


Categories: et cetera,myninjaplease

Comments: No comments


This is Not a Diary

Image source

People think of blogging as similar to keeping a diary, but that’s really a very shallow comparison. Blogging is similar to diary writing in that both are a form of structured writing undertaken on a semi-regular basis and both are similar in length.

: Continue reading :

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: June 12th, 2011
at 11:08am by mnp


Categories: blogs,et cetera,internets

Comments: No comments


Best Coffee Shops to Work from in Seattle

: Click here :

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: June 10th, 2011
at 1:29pm by mnp


Categories: development,drinks,entrepreneurship,et cetera

Comments: No comments


Rewards and Risks of Blogging for an American Audience

: Continue reading :

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: June 7th, 2011
at 6:17pm by mnp


Categories: blogs,development,et cetera

Comments: No comments


iPad Newspaper Pricing

The problem with traditional newspapers is that they have traditional newsrooms and staffing levels to support, and I suspect this is why they are priced the way they are. Meanwhile, an iPad specific publication like The Daily was built from the ground up for digital, so they are staffed and run accordingly, hence why they charge just a buck a week.

I already read plenty of international, tech, and business news from the web (and my digital subscription to The Economist), but I really wish I had a great source for Canadian economic and political news. The Globe and Mail fits the bill, but their iPad app sort of sucks and it’s pricey when I can get most of the content I want for free on their website.

Who does your iPad newspaper edition compete with — traditionally priced print newspapers, or the vast amount of free content on the web? The Daily understands they’re competing with free, and have priced accordingly. (Source)

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: June 4th, 2011
at 12:37pm by mnp


Categories: business,et cetera

Comments: No comments


Publishing The Unpublishable

Image source

What constitutes an unpublishable work? It could be many things: too long, too experimental, too dull; too exciting; it could be a work of juvenilia or a style you’ve long since discarded; it could be a work that falls far outside the range of what you’re best known for; it could be a guilty pleasure or it could simply be that the world judges it to be awful, but you think is quite good. We’ve all got a folder full of things that would otherwise never see the light of day.

Invited authors were invited to ponder to that question. The works found here are their responses, ranging from an 1018-page manuscript (unpublishable due to its length) to a volume of romantic high school poems written by a now-respected innovative poet. You get the idea.

The web is a perfect place to test the limits of unpublishability. With no printing, design or distribution costs, we are free to explore that which would never have been feasible, economically and aesthetically. While this exercise began as an exploration and provocation, the resultant texts are unusually rich; what we once considered to be our trash may, after all, turn out to be our greatest treasure. (Source)

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: June 1st, 2011
at 1:14am by mnp


Categories: et cetera,web

Comments: No comments


How to Stop Comparing Yourself to Others

: Continue reading here :

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 31st, 2011
at 6:04pm by mnp


Categories: development,et cetera,life,philosophy

Comments: No comments


Who is Joi Ito?

Born in Kyoto in 1966, the internationally educated Ito dropped out of two different colleges and, as early as 1985, became one of the first people to register for and study an online course. This knack for early adoption served him well in later years, and he’s now credited with a hodgepodge variety of ‘firsts’, even having helped kickstart the nascent rave scene in Japan.

.:timeout.jp->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 31st, 2011
at 6:03pm by mnp


Categories: development,entrepreneurship,et cetera,innovation,philosophy,web,who is?

Comments: No comments


How to Start a Group

It seems that there are two ways to create a group. And when I say "group" I mean a software team, a band, a company, a project, or whatever.

One way is for one person to have an idea and start working on it. Soon he drags in another guy and they work on it until there’s a solid foundation to the group and things are rolling. Pretty soon other people start to notice and ask to join. They join one by one and are indoctrinated to the philosophy of the group. The hard decisions have been made, so the only people who are attracted are those who want to actually contribute.

The other way is for one person to have an idea and broadcast, "Hey everyone! I’ve got this idea and I think we should start a group to do it! I’ve created a mailing list for it, so everyone who’s interested should subscribe and we’ll all create something great!" A bzillion people join, there’s lots of enthusiasm and energy, and they argue so much over the name of the group and what the icon should look like that nothing gets done.

Every time I’ve seen approach #1 it has worked out pretty well, and every time I’ve seen #2 it’s fallen apart. Examples of #1 are Linux, MacBSD, most bands, HTML, Apple, the United States, and Microsoft. Examples of #2 are MacLinux, the PDI band, NeXT, the Perot campaign, the European Union, and VRML 2.0.

People are quick to volunteer work and slow to work. The quickest way to kill a project is to attract people who will grind it to a halt with their enthusiastic non-action. Slow assimilation works best.

.:teamten.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 30th, 2011
at 5:32pm by mnp


Categories: development,et cetera,internets,ninjas are everyehere,weaponry

Comments: No comments