Archive for the ‘web’ Category

Social is Just the Beginning

You know how you keep hearing that social media is the future of marketing? And how social networks are changing the way people behave? There's clearly something going on here, but it's only the beginning.

: Continue reading :

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: December 5th, 2010
at 7:37am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: web,blogs

Comments: No comments


Internet TV Land Rush

One of the interesting things to do in a land rush is to figure out whose land is getting taken. We've watched eBay, Google, and Craigslist eating Newsprint's lunch. We've watched Apple eat Sony's lunch, and now it's going after the Recording Industry, HollywoodAand the TV Networks. Simultaneously.

Sure, there are a few exceptions. The Simpsons. Thirty Rock. The Office. But even the good stuff is forced to be somewhat retarded by the strictures of the network system.AEver seen the original Office, the one made in England? Way better than the one on NBC. Let's face it. Network TV blows. The system blows. The business model blows. The consumer experience blows. But worst of all the content blows. What's more, the system is set up in such a way that it pretty much requires the content to blow.

.:weblog.raganwald.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 27th, 2010
at 2:16pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: web,development,blogs,tele

Comments: No comments


Scalability

Professor David J. Malan discusses scalability as it pertains to building dynamic websites.

.:academicearth.org->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 27th, 2010
at 11:45am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: web,development

Comments: No comments


Long Live the Web

Several threats to the Web's universality have arisen recently. Cable television companies that sell Internet connectivity are considering whether to limit their Internet users to downloading only the company's mix of entertainment. Social-networking sites present a different kind of problem. Facebook, LinkedIn, Friendster and others typically provide value by capturing information as you enter it: your birthday, your e-mail address, your likes, and links indicating who is friends with whom and who is in which photograph. The sites assemble these bits of data into brilliant databases and reuse the information to provide value-added serviceabut only within their sites. Once you enter your data into one of these services, you cannot easily use them on another site. Each site is a silo, walled off from the others. Yes, your site's pages are on the Web, but your data are not. You can access a Web page about a list of people you have created in one site, but you cannot send that list, or items from it, to another site.

The isolation occurs because each piece of information does not have a URI. Connections among data exist only within a site. So the more you enter, the more you become locked in. Your social-networking site becomes a central platformaa closed silo of content, and one that does not give you full control over your information in it. The more this kind of architecture gains widespread use, the more the Web becomes fragmented, and the less we enjoy a single, universal information space.

A related danger is that one social-networking siteaor one search engine or one browseragets so big that it becomes a monopoly, which tends to limit innovation. As has been the case since the Web began, continued grassroots innovation may be the best check and balance against any one company or government that tries to undermine universality.AGnuSocial andADiaspora are projects on the Web that allow anyone to create their own social network from their own server, connecting to anyone on any other site. TheAStatus.net project, which runs sites such asAidenti.ca, allows you to operate your ownATwitter-like network without the Twitter-like centralization.

.:scientificamerican.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 19th, 2010
at 5:12pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: web,science

Comments: No comments


The World is Not Flat : Ponoko

Ponoko is bringing the power of product design to the masses. We began in 2007 by offering laser-cutting and earlier this year added electronics to the mix. Today we are elated to announce that the new Ponoko Personal Factory 4 offers 3D printing! ACloudFab has joined our global digital making network, giving Ponoko customers the ability to create 3D printed designs. All with no set up fees, no minimum orders, and a free one year replacement policy. AWe've added five new 3D printable materials to our materials catalog including durable white plastic, superfine plastic, rainbow color plastic, stainless steel, and gold plated stainless steel.

.:blog.ponoko.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 17th, 2010
at 10:32pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: web,design,blogs

Comments: 1 comment


EYEBEAM : Aram Bartholl

This a preview of "Dead Drops", a project by Aram Bartholl which he started off during his ongoing EYEBEAM residency in NYC. It is an anonymous, offline, peer to peer file-sharing network in public space. Aram "injected" 5 USB flash drives into walls, buildings and curbs accessable to anybody. You are invited to go to these places to drop or find files on a dead drop. Plug your laptop to a wall, house or pole to share your files and date. Each dead drop contains a readme.txt file explaining the project. I guess the most prominent location is right next to the New Museum, the other 4 locations are listed on Aram's website.

.:amandinealessandra.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 17th, 2010
at 10:21pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: computers,art,web,weaponry,architecture,design,contemporary,et cetera

Comments: No comments


Curation And The Human Web

The human element is important but it’s expensive, which is why Silicon Valley tech companies favor software and machines. Silicon Valley investors fund businesses that are scalable, that can be expanded by simply adding more servers and software.

People-based businesses are not scalable in the same way - you need to hire more people to do more. People add complexity, require management, vacations, and labor costs always trend up. In comparison, servers and software costs keep falling and their productivity increases.

The cheapest way to add a human layer is to improve machine aggregation by taking clues from what people do online, what they share, what they write, and what they discuss.

That’s why tech companies talk about the "social web" and social graphs. These are ways of improving their technologies without having to employ people.

.:siliconvalleywatcher.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 17th, 2010
at 10:14pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: web,development

Comments: No comments


Livestream of The Web 2.0 Summit

web20tv on livestream.com. Broadcast Live Free

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 17th, 2010
at 5:26pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: youtube,web,development

Comments: No comments


Hierarchical File Systems are Dead

For over forty years, we have assumed hierarchical file system namespaces. These namespaces were a rudimen- tary attempt at simple organization. As users have be- gun to interact with increasing amounts of data and are increasingly demanding search capability, such a simple hierarchical model has outlasted its usefulness. For this reason, we should design file systems whose organizations map to the ways we access and manipulate data now. We present a new file system architecture in which we replace the hierarchical namespace with a tagged, search-based one.

.:eecs.harvard.edu->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 14th, 2010
at 1:59am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: web,development,education

Comments: No comments