Archive for October, 2010

Einstein on Buddhism

Buddhism has the characteristics of what would be expected in a cosmic religion for the future: It transcends a personal God, avoids dogmas and theology; it covers both the natural and the spiritual, and it is based on a religious sense aspiring from the experience of all things, natural and spiritual, as a meaningful unity.

and:

The religion of the future will be a cosmic religion. It should transcend personal God and avoid dogma and theology. Covering both the natural and the spiritual, it should be based on a religious sense arising from the experience of all things natural and spiritual as a meaningful unity. Buddhism answers this description. If there is any religion that could cope with modern scientific needs it would be Buddhism.

.:tricycleblog->

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 6th, 2010
at 1:32pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: 9th dan,science,blogs

Comments: No comments


Cartographies of Time: A History of the Timeline

The "Temple of Time," created in 1846 by the pioneering American girls' educator Emma Willard, draws on the tradition of Renaissance "memory theaters," mnemonic devices that allowed people to memorize information by imagining it as architectural details in a three-dimensional mental space. The vertical columns represent centuries, with those on the right showing names of important figures from the Old World while those on the left show figures from the New World.

.:nytimes.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 6th, 2010
at 1:29pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: art,maps

Comments: No comments


Becoming a Tech Nomad Ninja

Rocking the Tech Nomad Lifestyle is not an easy life, but I think it is actually easier than becoming a Tech Nomad. I held back for years and never really understood where I was going with it when I actually made the jump back in 2002. Back then the words, Tech Nomad, Lifestyle Design, Digital Nomad, Location Independent and all these terms did simply not exist yet. I was simply referred to as a Traveller or Backpacker and all the life hacks, wisdom and travel tricks would be learned from fellow travellers, vagabonds and other awesome people that I would meet along the way. Right now today, it is a thousands of times Adue to the internet, all the info you ever need is Aall there and accessible from anywhere. AI am by no way an expert as this modern digital travelling entrepreneur lifestyle but I am rocking it my way and learning as I go. I've broken down the process of becoming a Tech Nomad Ninja into three simple steps.

.:miltblog.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 6th, 2010
at 1:17pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: hood status,life,"ninja",development,blogs

Comments: No comments


Map of Online Communities 2010

.:xkcd.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 6th, 2010
at 1:11pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: internets,maps

Comments: No comments


Quote of the Day

The space of play and the space of thought are the two theaters of freedom. - Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 6th, 2010
at 8:05am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: quote of the day

Comments: No comments


Vision Interference Perfection

DITCH those bifocals. You might soon wearing spectacles whose lenses allow you to see clearly regardless of how long or short-sighted you are.

With age, the lenses in our eyes often lose the ability to change shape enough to focus light from near objects onto the retina - a condition called presbyopia. This leaves people who were already short-sighted unable to focus on either near or distant objects. Bifocals offer a solution by having two lenses in the same frame, but users must get used to tilting their head up or down to switch focus.

Zeev Zalevsky at Bar-Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel, has developed a technique to turn a standard lens into one that perfectly focuses light from anything between 33 centimetres away and the horizon.

It involves engraving the surface of a standard lens with a grid of 25 near-circular structures each 2 millimetres across and containing two concentric rings. The engraved rings are just a few hundred micrometres wide and a micrometre deep. "The exact number and size of the sets will change from one lens to another," depending on its size and shape, says Zalevsky.

The rings shift the phase of the light waves passing through the lens, leading to patterns of both constructive and destructive interference. Using a computer model to calculate how changes in the diameter and position of the rings alter the pattern, Zalevsky came up with a design that creates a channel of constructive interference perpendicular to the lens through each of the 25 structures. Within these channels, light from both near and distant objects is in perfect focus.

.:newscientist.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 6th, 2010
at 8:03am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: science

Comments: No comments


Super Mario Bros. Unknowns

Ten Things You Didn’t Know About Super Mario Bros.

.:blogs.ocweekly.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 6th, 2010
at 7:44am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: games,fo' real?,blogs

Comments: No comments


Coding Blind

When carpenters learn their trade, they do so by seeing others. They see other carpenters hammer nails and saw wood. Same thing with surgeons. They see other surgeons operate. But it's not like that for programmers. They're "taught" programming in school, or teach they themselves, but they don't literally see other programmers work. In the carpenter analogy, it's as if you were taught the theory of how to hammer nails, then had to go do it for the rest of your professional life, and every other carpenter worked in a closed room.

Due to high quality open source, it's easy to see the final output of world-class programmers. Just download the source, and start reading it. But what about the nuts and bolts, the mechanics? You can't see the seemingly insignificant things that you have to repeat a thousand times over to get to clean and working code. Working your editor or IDE. Running the build. Running the tests. Keyboard shortcuts. Customizations. Shell scripts. Sketching out designs. Sketching out pseudo-code. Writing a ton of code, then having to back out of it and start over.

Great artists and writers often leave behind a large amount of work exhaust other than their finished masterpieces: notebooks, sketches, letters and journals. These auxiliary work products are as important as the finished item in understanding them and their work. But in programming, all that is shunned. The only thing that counts is the finished code, checked in. But one could often learn a lot more from that dirty piece of code, strewn with commented-out sections, that got thrown away.

That's probably the reason programmers are such voracious readers of what other programmers write about their tools and tricks. It's a tiny peek into their actual "hammering." That's also why (now I know) it irks me so much when I see another programmer use a tool inefficiently. For example, wade through menus and sub-menus for 30 seconds to accomplish something when you could do it in half a second with a keyboard shortcut. Or keep typing in the same long commands and not write a shell script for it.

We're all coding blind, each in our own little bubble.

.:vivekhaldar.tumblr.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 5th, 2010
at 8:00am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: development

Comments: No comments


Coin Flip

On Monday, you flip a coin all day. You start flipping it until you see the pattern Head, Tail, Head. You record the number of flips required to reach this pattern, and start flipping again (and counting up from 1 again) until you see that pattern again, you record the second number, and start again. At the end of the day you average all of the numbers you've recorded.
On Tuesday you do theAEXACTAsame thing except you flip until you see the pattern Head, Tail, Tail.

Will Monday's number be higher than Tuesday's, equal to Tuesday's, or lower than Tuesday's?

[if you're checking your answer, enter "higher", "lower", or "equal"

.:mindcipher.net->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 5th, 2010
at 7:47am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: games

Comments: No comments