Archive for the ‘maps’ Category

Cable Map

.:cablemap.info->

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: December 16th, 2009
at 5:44pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: maps

Comments: No comments


Generative Cartography

Generative art is simply that created through aAdegree of autonomy, such as defined by aAcomputer software algorithm.AProcessing is one such programming language that can do this. The examples here are from aAproject entitledASubstrate by JaredATarbell.

Each iteration creates an entirely new image; aAnew pattern and form every time. As such, variations in density are common, with larger structures revealing themselves and coming to the fore. But, as density increases with time, eventually all open space seems to disappear. But, akin to Mandelbrot patterns, you simply need to zoom in to see new patterns emerging in what seems to be an infinite world.

Generative art, yes, but because of itsmap-like qualities, it is alsoAgenerative cartography. Mapping created by plotting GPS trails is also aAform of generative cartography. Generative approaches have also been investigated in the realms of more conventional (topographic) map creation. There are alsoAself-organising maps (SOM), which are like slices through multi-dimensional data.

.:yellowfields.co.uk->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 19th, 2009
at 6:30pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: art,maps

Comments: No comments


1,000 Years of European History

YouTube Preview Image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 13th, 2009
at 2:20pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: today in history,ir,maps

Comments: No comments


How the West was Won

People, it suggests, are much the same all over the world. The reason why some groups stuck with hunting and gathering while others built empires and had industrial revolutions has nothing to do with genetics, beliefs, attitudes, or great men: it was simply a matter of geography.

China and India are, of course poised to pick up the baton of global superpowers, but to explain why the West rules, we have to plunge back 15,000 years to the point when the world warmed up at the end of the last ice age.

Geography then dictated that there were only a few regions on the planet where farming was possible, because only they had the kinds of climate and landscape which allowed the evolution of wild plants and animals that could potentially be domesticated.

.:bbc.co.uk->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 10th, 2009
at 7:19pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: ir,maps

Comments: No comments


Magnificent Maps that Didn’t Make the Exhibition

This map is one of the British Library’s greatest treasures. It is a set of maps of the province of Jiangxi in south eastern China (a detail of it is illustrated above). The map has been paintedAwith incredible colours and delicacy onto silk, which creates a mesmerising shimmering effect. Just look at the depth of thoseAblues. The image doesn’t show it, but the water has this amazing ‘fish-scale’ pattern effect to it.

We think that this map was intended for administrative use. It shows the historic divisions of the individual prefectures, the roads, rivers (this is a particularly wet part of China - the Yangtze river forms part of its northern boundary) and more importantly the river crossings. Towns are shown as walled settlements, with government buildings and Confucian schools afforded special prominence. Administrative, practicalAstuff. So why is it so beautiful?

The ideaAthat functionality and artistry are mutually inclusive isAsomething we’ve explored in the exhibition. When you think about it, maps can be both useful and beautiful. There has to be an element of artistry in a map for it to fulfil its purpose, even if it is the mere act of drawing or engraving onto a flat surface. These are artistic techniques!AAnd do not forget that administrative maps such as the Jiangxi map would have been looked at and used by high-ranking officials, who would have demanded theAhighest standards of decoration, taste and beauty, even in their maps.

.:britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 10th, 2009
at 7:02pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: maps

Comments: No comments


Journalists Killed in the Line of Duty

.:mibazaar.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 8th, 2009
at 10:29pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: et cetera,maps

Comments: No comments


Test Your Geography Skills

.:bhoogolvidya.appspot.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 7th, 2009
at 3:59pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: maps

Comments: No comments


Public Discourse in the Russian Blogosphere: Mapping RuNet Politics and Mobilization

With funding from the MacArthur Foundation, the Berkman Center is undertaking a two-year research project to investigate the role of the Internet in Russian society. The study will include a number of interrelated areas of inquiry that contribute to and draw upon the Russian Internet, including the Russian blogosphere, Twitter, and the online media ecology. In addition to investigating a number of core Internet and communications questions, a key goal for the project is to test, refine, and integrate various methodological approaches to the study of the Internet more broadly. This working paper analyzes the Russian blogosphere, with an emphasis on politics; it is the project’s first public research release.

.:cyber.law.harvard.edu->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 7th, 2009
at 1:17pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: internets,education,maps

Comments: No comments


Trading in Siberia

Wissner-Gross and Freer rounded up the locations and price-speeds on the 52 largest global exchanges, and plotted a map of the ideal locations for traders who would want to be perfectly positioned between any given pair. The map, which appears today in an article in the journal Physical Review E, dictates that some traders’ servers will be ideally positioned in central Africa, others in the remotest forests of Canada, others in the middle of the Indian Ocean, and still others in Siberia. This all assumes, of course, a proper infrastructure in place-in the short term, Freer tells Fast Company, it might make more sense to approximate these locations, rather than invest in installing a server farm underneath the ocean.

.:fastcompany.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 6th, 2009
at 3:57pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: trade,maps

Comments: No comments