Archive for the ‘maps’ Category

Auckland’s Public Transport Network

.:sciblogs.co.nz->

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: January 21st, 2011
at 7:03am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: maps

Comments: 1 comment


Bernard Ratzer : Plan of the City of New York

One gem that they've come across in their excavation is a 1770 map of the city of New York by Bernard Ratzer. Only three copies of this particular map exist in the world, the other two being at the British Library and the New-York Historical Society. "It was in absolutely appalling condition," says BHS map cataloguer Carolyn Hansen. "It had been shellacked, a poor preservation technique we now know. It was cracked. It was ripped. It was on its last legs. Truly." But, Hansen notes, it's also "the most detailed map of Brooklyn from a topographical standpoint from that time."

Now the map has been restored. "It's really detailed and a really important map," Weber said. "It's exciting that we have it."

Many of the approximately 2,000 maps in the collection had been stored off-site until this project began about a year ago a some of the last material to be brought back after BHS's entire archive had to be moved off-site to a facility upstate from 1997 to 2003, when their building in Brooklyn Heights was being renovated.

.:brooklyneagle.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: January 18th, 2011
at 8:04pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: maps

Comments: No comments


North American English Dialects Map

: Click to enlarge :

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: December 28th, 2010
at 2:16pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: maps,language

Comments: No comments


Isarithmic History of the Two-Party Presidential Vote

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 24th, 2010
at 7:16am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: politricks,maps

Comments: No comments


Cyborgs are Mapping Portland

GPS maps are a kind of technogeographical self portrait; a way of showing how one has lived during a certain period of time. The methods for taking data can reveal something about a person as well. There is no standard way of taking GPS data. One's map may differ greatly from another. For the past two years, Aaron Parecki has been carrying a GPS tracker with him at all times, walking, busing, biking, driving and flying. Amber Case has been taking data since January 2010. Together, they have logged over 10 million GPS points. These points have been plotted onto paper, then color-coded by time of day and speed of movement to render beuatiful and thought provoking prints that serve as "geotechnological" self-portraits. APortland-based PHP developer and GPS enthusiast Aaron Parecki experiments with automatic location check-ins and proximal notification systems. He also began using GPS to control the lights in his house and perform other automated actions.

.:grassyknollgallery.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 19th, 2010
at 4:41pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: art,maps

Comments: No comments


Walk the Earf : Earth as Art

Earth is truly beautiful whenAviewed from space. But add some false color produced by satellite sensors, and the result is stunning.

The U.S. Geological Survey has released a new selection of particularly interesting images from the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites. These space craft have been prolific sources of data for earth scientist, but the new shots were chosen solely based on aesthetics.

We’ve selected our favorites from the USGS’AEarth as Art collection in this gallery, which will take you on a tour of the world from the glaciers of Antarctica to the deserts of Algeria.

Images and captions courtesy USGS.

.:wired.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 18th, 2010
at 3:06am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: art,walk the earf,maps

Comments: No comments


Mapping the Impact of Traffic on the Livability of Streets

Donald Appleyard was a professor of Urban Design at the University of California, Berkeley. During his career he pursued a strong interest in the livability of cities and neighborhoods, particularly upon streets. In particular, he studied the social effects of traffic and neighborhood layout, and devised sensitive tools for the analysis of peoples’ environmental perceptions.

In aAgroundbreaking study [streetfilms.org] conducted in 1969, Donald Appleyard provided the first emperical evidence of the impact of traffic on neighborhood streets. In particular, he investigated 3 different streets in San Francisco that were chosen to be as identical as possible in every dimension except for one - the amount of traffic on each street. The study was able to show that just the mere presence of cars, with their implied aspects of danger, noise and pollution, crushes the quality of life in neighborhoods.

As a way of investigation, Donals Appleyard used various visual graphics to both gather data as well as bring his results across. For instance, one chart conveys the social interactions on the 3 different streets, with each line denoting a unique connection between one person on the street and another. There are much fewer lines on the heavily traffic street as opposed to the moderate or the light traffic street, which clearly has a lot more interconnections. This chart also includes clusters of little dots that indicate where people physically gather. So it shows how on the heavily traffic street, there are a much smaller number of dots and there are only a handful of places where people would gather on their street.

.:infosthetics.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 16th, 2010
at 5:45pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: rush hour,maps

Comments: No comments


Art from Code: World Wide Webs

.:artfromcode.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 13th, 2010
at 6:43pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: art,development,maps

Comments: No comments


Luis Dourado

.:luisdourado.net->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 11th, 2010
at 1:35pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: art,maps

Comments: No comments