Archive for the ‘trade’ Category

Trade School : Barter for Instruction NYC

Longboard Skateboarding 101 and Mend Your Life: Pragmatic and Expressive Sweater Darning (Class Full) are some of the classes offered for this term, check out the schedule!

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: March 5th, 2011
at 11:00am by mnp


Categories: education,trade

Comments: No comments


The Future of (un)Consumption

A new wave of Collaborative Consumption is making sense across the world:

"While it may continue to be necessary to buy certain things ‘new,'" Anderson said, "Collaborative Consumption has the potential to be an equal counterpart to other more traditional forms of consumption."

Anderson added that businesses that stick doggedly to the practices of wasteful consumption are likely to go the way of Blockbuster and Borders.

"Some industries might be slower than others in recognizing the importance of a Collaborative Consumption model," Anderson conceded. "[But] those who don’t catch up will certainly be left behind the newcomers."

.:mcgilldaily.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: March 4th, 2011
at 8:25am by mnp


Categories: web,business,weaponry,real life news,"ninja",et cetera,diy,development,internets,philosophy,trade

Comments: No comments


What’s New? : The Data Fountain

What's New? covering what's new in tech, this week looks at data fountains. In the hope of displaying implicit financial data, these dudes have come up with a new form of information decoration, in the form of fountains.

.:koert.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 24th, 2011
at 8:04pm by mnp


Categories: myninjaplease,green,weaponry,design,science,"ninja",internets,what's new?,trade

Comments: No comments


Death from Opinions

Image source

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 3rd, 2011
at 12:56pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: trade

Comments: No comments


A Gentler and More Logical Economics

Image source

Neoclassical economics is built on very strong assumptions that, over time, have become "established facts." Most famous among these are that all economic agents (consumers, companies, etc., are fully rational, and that the so-called invisible hand works to create market efficiency). To rational economists, these assumptions seem so basic, logical, and self-evident that they do not need any empirical scrutiny.

Building on these basic assumptions, rational economists make recommendations regarding the ideal way to design health insurance, retirement funds, and operating principles for financial institutions. This is, of course, the source of the basic belief in the wisdom of deregulation: if people always make the right decisions, and if the "invisible hand" and market forces always lead to efficiency, shouldn't we just let go of any regulations and allow the financial markets to operate at their full potential?

On the other hand, scientists in fields ranging from chemistry to physics to psychology are trained to be suspicious of "established facts." In these fields, assumptions and theories are tested empirically and repeatedly. In testing them, scientists have learned over and over that many ideas accepted as true can end up being wrong; this is the natural progression of science. Accordingly, nearly all scientists have a stronger belief in data than in their own theories. If empirical observation is incompatible with a model, the model must be trashed or amended, even if it is conceptually beautiful, logically appealing, or mathematically convenient.

.:danariely.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: January 24th, 2011
at 1:20pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: trade

Comments: No comments


How Bloggers Beat Wall Street

Image source

Wednesday was a great day. The so-called "amateurs" beat Wall Street's finest by correctly predicting Apple's (AAPL) reported earnings for their most recent quarter. And people are starting to take notice.

In aACNN Money list of the best (and worst) Apple earnings predictions, the bottom 20 spots (out of 41) were firmly occupied by the "professionals". In fact, barring two bloggers, the bottom 30 were all analysts. The top 9 were individual investors.

Naturally, many people will be surprised by this and rightly so. It's common sense to think that handsomely paid professionals who spend countless hours evaluating companies and who have the best investing tools in the world available to them would easily beat a few guys with a laptop and an internet connection.

.:blog.vuru.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: January 20th, 2011
at 6:39pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: apple,blogs,trade

Comments: No comments


History of the Stock Market

This graph of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, from 1913 to the present, highlights the impact of wars on the market (a long-term flattening, with cyclical changes within) and interludes of peace, during which the Dow sprints upwards. The chart also shows the Consumer Price Index, during the same period of time.

.:csmonitor.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: January 18th, 2011
at 7:55pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: trade

Comments: No comments


The Kalamazoo Beer Exchange

The Kalamazoo Beer Exchange, located at 211 E. Water St., formerly home of Charlie Fosters, opened last week for lunch only from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Once the Michigan Liquor Control Commission releases the license from escrow, owner James Flora will offer a unique concept for beer lovers.

Flora has 28 taps ready to host some of the best Michigan craft beer, as well as some imported and domestic brews.

His bar/restaurant features several TVs that will show the price of all 28 beers.

Depending on what customers purchase, the prices will rise or fall.

"It's an ever-evolving happy hour," Flora said.

: Continue reading the article :

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: January 17th, 2011
at 8:47pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: drinks,trade

Comments: No comments


Munger’s Worldly Wisdom

Image source

I’m going to play a minor trick on you today a because the subject of my talk is the art of stock picking as a subdivision of the art of worldly wisdom.AAThat enables me to start talking about worldly wisdom a a much broader topic that interests me because I think all too little of it is delivered by modern educational systems, at least in an effective way.

And therefore, the talk is sort of along the lines that some behaviorist psychologists call Grandma’s rule after the wisdom of Grandma when she said that you have to eat the carrots before you get the dessert.

The carrot part of this talk is about the general subject of worldly wisdom which is a pretty good way to start.AAAfter all, the theory of modern education is that you need aAgeneral education before youAspecialize. And I think to some extent, before you’re going to be a great stock picker, you need some general education.

So, emphasizing what I sometimes waggishly callAremedial worldly wisdom, I’m going to start by waltzing you through a few basic notions.

What is elementary, worldly wisdom?AAWell, the first rule is that you can’t really know anything if you just remember isolated facts and try and bang ’emAback.AAIf the facts don’t hang together on a latticework of theory, you don’t have them in a usable form.

.:paladinvest.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: January 11th, 2011
at 2:44pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: development,trade

Comments: No comments