Archive for the ‘science’ Category

The Global Consciousness Project

The Global Consciousness Project is an international collaboration of scientists, engineers, and artists. We maintain a global network that has been collecting data continuously since 1998 from sensitive instruments which produce random sequences. Our purpose is to examine subtle correlations and structure in the data that seem to reflect the presence and activity of consciousness in the world. Looking at major global events including both tragedies and celebrations, we have learned that when millions of us share thoughts and emotions the GCP network shows correlations. We interpret this as evidence for interconnections at a deep, unconscious level. An implication is that we are part of a growing global consciousness or oneness.

From a CBS2 news item recorded by Brian Keefe in July 2005. For more information on the GCP, go to noosphere.princeton.edu

YouTube Preview Image
email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: March 3rd, 2011
at 4:59pm by mnp


Categories: art,too good to be true,science,"ninja",philosophy

Comments: No comments


DIY : Become a Memory Champion

Memrise’s co-founder, Grandmaster of Memory Ed Cooke taught Josh Foer how to do it in one year, read about the process.

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: March 3rd, 2011
at 4:55pm by mnp


Categories: science,diy

Comments: No comments


Practicing Mindfulness

For further reading check out this site- in the video below, Jon Kabat-Zinn leads a session on mindfulness at Google.

YouTube Preview Image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: March 3rd, 2011
at 4:44pm by mnp


Categories: science,health,philosophy

Comments: No comments


Embodied Cognition

Image source

Seth Snyder writes about everyday objects:

Imagine using embodied cognition principles to transform education, shifting the focus from static reading, writing, and reciting to movement and simulation. Imagine if rehabilitative medicine specialists could use their understanding of their patients’ embodied cognitive abilities to help them recover lost skills after a stroke or other brain injury. This research proves that designers can use a knowledge of embodied cognition to re-investigate and invent new, more successful physical tools and interactions for a variety of applications.

.:johnnyholland.org->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: March 1st, 2011
at 10:03am by mnp


Categories: science

Comments: No comments


The Star Wars Effect

From ILM to Pixar to Photoshop and back to Finding Nemo (don’t forget Willow!), in 1971 Lucas Film inspired generations…

Click to enlarge

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 28th, 2011
at 7:58am by mnp


Categories: music,art,too good to be true,games,robots,film,weaponry,design,science,development,internets,americana

Comments: No comments


What’s New? : The Data Fountain

What's New? covering what's new in tech, this week looks at data fountains. In the hope of displaying implicit financial data, these dudes have come up with a new form of information decoration, in the form of fountains.

.:koert.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 24th, 2011
at 8:04pm by mnp


Categories: myninjaplease,green,weaponry,design,science,"ninja",internets,what's new?,trade

Comments: No comments


TED : Bruce Feiler

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 13th, 2011
at 11:05am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: science,development,health

Comments: No comments


Evidence for Neural Networks

Image source

It is common knowledge that the human brain is horrifically complicated - perhaps the single most complex thing of which humans are aware. I am often asked if we understand how the brain works, often phrased to imply a false dichotomy, a yes-or-no answer. Rather, we understand quite a bit about how the brain is organized, what functions it has and how they work and connect together, and we know quite a bit about brain physiology, biochemistry, and electrical function. But there is also a great deal we do not know - layers of complexity we have not yet sorted out. I would not say that the brain is a "mystery" - but rather that we understandA a lot, but we also have much to discover.

One aspect of brain function that is an active area of investigation is the overall organization of brain systems. Specifically - to what degree is the brain organized into discrete modules or regions that carry out specific functions vs distributed networks that are carrying out those functions? IAhave written about this debate before, concluding that the answer is both. As is often the case in science, when there are two schools of thought, each with compelling evidence in their favor, it often turns out that both schools are correct.

I would summarize our current knowledge (I would not call this a consensus as there is still vigorous debate on this issue, but this is how I put the evidence together) as the brain being comprised of identifiable regions that are specialized for a specific type of information processing. These regions, or modules, connect and communicate with other regions in networks. Some of these networks represent discrete functions themselves, but they may also just be ways for different modules to communicate the results of their processing to other modules. A given module may participate in many networks, although they will tend to cluster around the same theme.

.:theness.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 13th, 2011
at 9:43am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: science

Comments: No comments


Introduction to Human Behavioral Biology

YouTube Preview Image

Stanford professor Robert Sapolsky gave the opening lecture of the course entitled Human Behavioral Biology and explains the basic premise of the course and how he aims to avoid categorical thinking.

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 13th, 2011
at 9:36am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: science,education

Comments: No comments