Archive for the ‘science’ Category

World’s First Commercial Quantum Computer

: Click here to buy :

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 21st, 2011
at 4:01pm by mnp


Categories: computers,science

Comments: No comments


Seeds Of Doubt

Image source

We pride ourselves on our skepticism and our nullius in verba approach to scientific questions. Many people are familiar with the works of Carl Sagan, Richard Feynman, and Martin Gardner. The vague platitudes of astrology and the self-delusion of television psychics are not for us. However, scientists such as ourselves are not immune to self-delusion, and even the brightest among us can fall prey to the substitution of wishful thinking for rigorous logic when the science points to conclusions that uncomfortably conflict with our world view.

.:pubs.acs.org->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 21st, 2011
at 4:00pm by mnp


Categories: too good to be true,politricks,fo' real?,science,"ninja",development,philosophy

Comments: No comments


Norman Doidge : Neuroplasticity

Psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, and best-selling author, Dr. Norman Doidge, at a University of Toronto interdisciplinary symposium on "Altered States of Mind". He discusses his latest book, The Brain that Changes Itself, an examination of the most important breakthrough in neuroscience: the discovery of neuroplasticity. He describes how our thoughts can change the structure and function of our brains.

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 15th, 2011
at 9:52am by mnp


Categories: life,science,development,philosophy

Comments: No comments


Per Aspera Ad Astra

What one day may be…

YouTube Preview Image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 12th, 2011
at 4:26pm by mnp


Categories: too good to be true,space

Comments: No comments


Galactic Winds

Image source

With observations from the PACS instrument on board the ESA Herschel space observatory, an international team of scientists led by the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics have found gigantic storms of molecular gas gusting in the centres of many galaxies. Some of these massive outflows reach velocities of more than 1000 kilometres per second, i.e. thousands of times faster than in terrestrial hurricanes. The observations show that the more active galaxies contain stronger winds, which can blow away the entire gas reservoir in a galaxy, thereby inhibiting both further star formation and the growth of the central black hole. This finding is the first conclusive evidence for the importance of galactic winds in the evolution of galaxies. (Source)

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 12th, 2011
at 4:26pm by mnp


Categories: space

Comments: No comments


What is the Philtrum?

The groove that joins your face together…

YouTube Preview Image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 12th, 2011
at 4:26pm by mnp


Categories: science,what is?

Comments: No comments


Women in Science

Image source

Science doesn’t pay:

There are three broad hypotheses about the sources of the very substantial disparities that this conference’s papers document [percentage of women among tenured professors of science] and have been documented before with respect to the presence of women in high-end scientific professions. One is what I would call the-I’ll explain each of these in a few moments and comment on how important I think they are-the first is what I call the high-powered job hypothesis. The second is what I would call different availability of aptitude at the high end, and the third is what I would call different socialization and patterns of discrimination in a search. And in my own view, their importance probably ranks in exactly the order that I just described. (Source)

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 12th, 2011
at 9:38am by mnp


Categories: science,jobs

Comments: No comments


Rice and the Solar Autoclave

Rice University senior engineering students are using the sun to power an autoclave that sterilizes medical instruments and help solve a long-standing health issue for developing countries.

The Capteur Soleil, a device designed decades ago by French inventor Jean Boubour, was modified at Rice two years ago for use as a solar-powered cookstove for places where electricity — or fuel of any kind — is hard to get.

This year, Team Sterilize modified it further. When a set of curved mirrors and an insulated box containing the autoclave are installed, the steel A-frame sitting outside Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchenbecomes something else entirely — a lifesaver.

The system produces steam by focusing sunlight along a steel tube at the frame’s apex. Rather than pump steam directly into the autoclave, the Rice team’s big idea was to use the steam to heat a custom-designed conductive hotplate.

"It basically becomes a stovetop, and you can heat anything you need to," said Sam Major, a member of the team with seniors Daniel Rist, David Luker and William Dunk, all mechanical engineering students. "As long as the autoclave reaches 121 Celsius for 30 minutes (the standard set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), everything should be sterile, and we’ve found we’re able to do that pretty easily." (Source)

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 8th, 2011
at 9:06am by mnp


Categories: green,science,development,health,education

Comments: No comments


Erasing Painful Memories

Image source

Scientists claim they are on the verge of a breakthrough after finding a way to potentially delete trauma from our minds.

They have discovered a link between a protein called PKM and our recollection of disturbing events.

Their study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, could have profound implications for war veterans, the victims of violent crimes and those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.

Lead researcher David Glanzman, from the University of California, Los Angeles, said: ‘I think we will be able to alter memories someday to reduce the trauma from our brains. (Source)

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 5th, 2011
at 7:49pm by mnp


Categories: science

Comments: No comments