Archive for the ‘not ninja-worthy’ Category

Would You Refuse to Hire Someone Wearing Dreadlocks?

TheAU.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is suing aAVirginia moving and storage business for refusing to hire a man who wears his hair in dreadlocks because of his religious beliefs.

Christopher Woodson — who has 14 years of experience in the moving industry — applied for a job at Lawrence Transportation Systems in May 2008. The company wouldn’t hire him as a loader because Woodson refused to cut his hair, alleges a complaint filed inAU.S. District Court in Virginia. Woodson wears his hair in dreadlocks, because his Rastafarian religious beliefs encourage followers to refrain from cutting their hair.

Woodson offered to tie up his hair or wear a cap, according to the lawsuit. But aALawrence Transportationhiring official rejected Woodson’s offer, the lawsuit states. Woodson worked for Lawrence Transportation before he became a practicing Rastafarian in 2004.

.:inc.com->

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: October 10th, 2010
at 8:21am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: not ninja-worthy,business,ethics

Comments: No comments


George Lucas Stole Chewbacca

The creation of Star Wars is comprehensive mythology onto itself, populated by rarely documented anecdotes, the likes ofA"the Millennium Falcon was inspired by a hamburger, with the outrigger cockpit being an olive off to the side" (1)AorA"My original inspiration for Chewbacca was my dog Indiana." (2), compelling enough to be repeated until they're so prevalent that theyAmust be true, and are accepted even by hardcore fans and Lucasfilm itself. Unfortunately sometimes they're embellished truths or half-truths, sometimes entirely false and in pretty much all cases oversimplifying a truly interesting, and luckily exceptionally well documented creative process.

And that's what this is about; the creative process. Cultural touchstones like Star Wars might seem to have sprung fully formed from the minds of their lauded creators, but as in all creative endeavors, movie making, web design or this very post, nothing could be further from the truth. Creation is a process, and strangely, by looking at how everyone's favorite plushy first-mate sprang into existence, we can learn a lot about any collaborative creative endeavor.

Unfortunately, perhaps because of the verisimilitude of the disciplines needed to make a film like Star Wars come together, the making-of narrative is surprisingly fragmented and often incomplete. A quick look at the bibliography needed to put together this post should give a good idea of justAhow fragmented. And once you're down the rabbit hole, you quickly learn that nothing found there can be taken at face value. Quotes, drawings, photos and diagrams lack sources, are undated, some old, some new, some so distorted as to be pure fiction and most of it entirely out of context.

.:binarybonsai.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: September 29th, 2010
at 1:28pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: myninjaplease,not ninja-worthy,film,mnp is for the children

Comments: No comments


What Will Future Generations Condemn Us For?

Once, pretty much everywhere, beating your wife and children was regarded as a father’s duty, homosexuality was a hanging offense, and waterboarding was approved — in fact, invented — by the Catholic Church. Through the middle of the 19th century, the United States and other nations in the Americas condoned plantation slavery. Many of our grandparents were born in states where women were forbidden to vote. And well into the 20th century, lynch mobs in this country stripped, tortured, hanged and burned human beings at picnics.

Looking back at such horrors, it is easy to ask: What were people thinking?

Yet, the chances are that our own descendants will ask the same question, with the same incomprehension, about some of our practices today.

Is there a way to guess which ones? After all, not every disputed institution or practice is destined to be discredited. And it can be hard to distinguish in real time between movements, such as abolition, that will come to represent moral common sense and those, such as prohibition, that will come to seem quaint or misguided. Recall the book-burners of Boston’s old Watch and Ward Society or the organizations for the suppression of vice, with their crusades against claret, contraceptives and sexually candid novels.

: Continue reading at washingtonpost.com :

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: September 27th, 2010
at 7:07pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: myninjaplease,life,not ninja-worthy,politricks

Comments: No comments


Who Got that Vocab?!

just-world phenomenon

The just-world phenomenon, also called the just-world theory, just-world fallacy, just-world effect, or just-world hypothesis, refers to the tendency for people to want to believe that the world is just so strongly that when they witness an otherwise inexplicable injustice they will rationalize it by searching for things that the victim might have done to deserve it. This deflects their anxiety, and lets them continue to believe the world is a just place, but often at the expense of blaming victims for things that were not, objectively, their fault.

Another theory entails the need to protect one’s own sense of invulnerability. This inspires people to believe that rape, for example, only happens to those who deserve or provoke the assault. This is a way of feeling safer. If the potential victim avoids the behaviors of the past victims then they themselves will remain safe and feel less vulnerable. (Wikipedia)

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: September 20th, 2010
at 8:42am by Black Ock

Tagged with


Categories: not ninja-worthy,who got that vocab?!,philosophy,ethics

Comments: No comments


My Ninja, Please! 07.06.10: Pau Gasol

I’m just sayin…

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: June 7th, 2010
at 11:18am by Black Ock


Categories: not ninja-worthy,games,fo' real?,10th dan

Comments: 1 comment


Are Cameras the New Guns?

The move to stop recording of police misconduct:

In response to a flood of Facebook and YouTube videos that depict police abuse, a new trend in law enforcement is gaining popularity. In at least three states (Illinois, Massachusetts, and Maryland), it is now illegal to record an on-duty police officer even if the encounter involves you and may be necessary to your defense, and even if the recording is on a public street where no expectation of privacy exists.

.:thefreemanonline.org->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Leaving the Internet

One comic book writer’s quest to leave the internet….

If you want to communicate with this revolutionary he will still be accepting snail mails.

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Ninja For Hire

The Wall Street Journal investigates the path and rise of the job title, "ninja." Over 800 self-titled ninjas are now public on LinkedIn- but is the ninja always a ninja or can they become a samurai?

The phenomenon started in 2003 and apparently really began to take off last year. Jinichi Kawakami, one of the last living ninjas in Iga, Japan, insists that "ninjas aren’t assassins and a real ninja must have stealth, intelligence, a righteous heart and patience."

Anyways, watch the video my ninjas..

thanks to orangemenace for the link

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Time to Rethink Design

David Carlson of the David Report has released a new trend look at the state of a full design world. Design contamination has taken over an expertise that is barely 100 years old; new products are simply the variations of old themes- (conceptual design, new articulations of the same, design signatures and design as art).

However if we are able to get back to using aging products and making design matter in a lifecycle, there is a cleaner horizon.

Designer Naoto Fukasawa: "I understand that myArole is about enhancing our living…. I've become moreAattached to the current life, and have started considering the betterment of our lives in a reality where we allAbelong, rather than predicting what could happen".

We need new storytellers:

Fred Alan Wolf - The Dreaming Universe (1994):A"Aboriginals believe in two forms of time: two parallelAstreams of activity. One is the daily objective activity,Athe other is an infinite spiritual cycle, called dreamtime,Amore real than reality itself…".

Carlson poses a great question, how do we A"change old habits and not to perpetuate the sales argument that the main role of designAis added value."

Read the full report in one of three forms: PDF, Flip Through Version or Text

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook