Category Archives: elections

More from the War Against Voters

Image: Source (and a good read)

As the nation gears up for the 2012 presidential election, Republican officials have launched an unprecedented, centrally coordinated campaign to suppress the elements of the Democratic vote that elected Barack Obama in 2008. Just as Dixiecrats once used poll taxes and literacy tests to bar black Southerners from voting, a new crop of GOP governors and state legislators has passed a series of seemingly disconnected measures that could prevent millions of students, minorities, immigrants, ex-convicts and the elderly from casting ballots. “What has happened this year is the most significant setback to voting rights in this country in a century,” says Judith Browne-Dianis, who monitors barriers to voting as co-director of the Advancement Project, a civil rights organization based in Washington, D.C. #read from RollingStone

Voter Suppression, the New Black

It’s kind of sad that we, as Americans, are basically forced to go outside of our traditional media outlets for alternative viewpoints. Something tells me you’d only find a story like this in American media AFTER an election, or in a MoveOn spam. Anyway, I think it’s interesting what people can get away with, legally, in the name of democracy. Same ole sh!t, though, basically.

I like the historical slant…

In the 1964 presidential elections, a young political operative named Bill guarded a largely African-American polling place in South Phoenix, Arizona like a bull mastiff.

Bill was a legal whiz who knew the ins and outs of voting law and insisted that every obscure provision be applied, no matter what. He even made those who spoke accented English interpret parts of the constitution to prove that they understood it. The lines were long, people fought, got tired or had to go to work, and many of them left without voting. It was a notorious episode long remembered in Phoenix political circles.

It turned out that it was part of a Republican Party strategy known as “Operation Eagle Eye”, and “Bill” was future Supreme Court Justice William Rehnquist. He was confronted with his intimidation tactics in his confirmation hearings years later, and characterised his behaviour as simple arbitration of polling place disputes. In doing so, he set a standard for GOP dishonesty and obfuscation surrounding voting rights that continues to this day. #read the rest at Al Jazeera

The Encyclodpedia of

Check out a thorough collection of articles about 9/11 via NYMAG‘s Encyclopedia of 9/11.

What Dinh didn’t anticipate was a profound shift in liberalism and, therefore, in the politics of the country. Even with a Democrat now in the White House, the liberalism that protects the right of the individual against the majority—the politics of civil rights and abortion and gay marriage—has diminished, in favor of one that aims to improve the lot of the median man. Obama’s liberalism is for the majority, not against it. This spirit, and the unlikely endurance of the Patriot Act, owes something to the central psychological events of the decade: the vitality and threat of new economic competitors, the social violence initiated by the authors of obscure financial instruments, but first and most of all September 11—each of which evoked a particular feeling, that we were all together, under attack. .::Patriot Act

The Rent is Too Damn High (SNL)

IF you haven’t heard of the “The Rent is too Damn High” Party, or seen the recently circulating clip from its helmsman, Jimmy MacMillan, at the NY gubernatorial debate, then this next skit won’t make sense to you.  However, I’m willing to bet that modern life doesn’t make too much sense to you either.

Not that funny, but he nailed the impression. It’s also way better than that other racist version which I will not post… but here’s a link.

Did a Simple Typo Kill Whitey?

Sometimes, typos matter — a lot. We’ve seen typos get law firms into all kinds of trouble. And now a typo might ruin the already slim gubernatorial chances of a Green Party candidate.

Running on the Green Party line, Rich Whitney wasn’t likely to become the next Governor of Illinois anyway. But an error at the Chicago Board of Elections will cause Whitney’s name to be misspelled as “Whitey” on some touch screen ballots this November. Of the 23 wards affected by this typo, half of them are in largely African-American districts. And the error cannot not be fixed in time for Election Day.

So yeah, black people in Chicago will be able to vote for “Rich Whitey” this fall. ##Read the rest!##

Fake Green Party Candidates – AZ

Reading tarot cards has taught Mr. Meadows, who is known for his purple and green jester hat, to talk a good game. “This is not the land of the free,” he told the loungers on the sidewalk, pitching himself for treasurer. “It’s the land of what’s for sale.”

“It’s unbelievable. It’s not right. It’s deceitful,” said Jackie Thrasher, a former Democratic legislator in northwest Phoenix who lost re-election in 2008 after a Green Party candidate with possible links to the Republicans joined the race. “If these candidates were interested in the democratic process, they should connect with the party they are interested in. What’s happening here just doesn’t wash. It doesn’t pass the smell test.”

Read More @ NYT Politics

60 was the loneliest number

We are still in denial here in MA… is this really our home state?

The consequences of Republican Scott Brown’s victory in the race for the Senate seat from Massachusetts fall into two categories. The first involves the optics of the race itself and the message Brown’s victory sends, about Obama’s first year, the economy, anti-incumbent sentiment, and the generalized “fuck ‘em all” feeling that seems to burst forth in American politics at times of stress. (The pollster Stan Greenberg a few years ago developed a taxonomy of voters that included the useful categories “F-You Boys” and “F-You Old Men,” groups that were quiet in 2008 but were heard from yesterday.) That message is somewhat complicated coming from Massachusetts and was provoked by the failure of a candidate who might as well have been a double agent for the Republican National Committee, but it won’t be perceived that way.

To the extent that the outcome is perceived as the beginning of the end of the Obama administration, and a one-blue-state equivalent to the 1994 Republican takeover, it is potentially a disaster. But that is the kind of straight-line projection that is the stock-in-trade of both Chris Matthews and the folks at OpenLeft.com, which produces the wild gyrations from ecstasy to despair that rarely prove correct. To the extent that it is perceived as an opportunity to press the reset button on the administration, to focus on the economy, and to go to the people rather than work inside Congress, with almost 11 months before the next election, it is potentially healthy… Read the Rest

Image Link

McCain on SNL

This dude was actually amusing on SNL [even if the first skit wasn't very funny]. My favorite is the ‘sad grandpa’, and Tiney Fey ‘going rogue’.

For a minute there I remembered how much I used to like and respect this guy. Maybe he’ll accept some position in the Obama White House [which he should be offered, I think] and return to the McCain of 2000 – help get this place back on track. That’s probably just wishful thinking.

Palin Talks 2012?

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMwv74rIGDU[/youtube]

Really, this is one of those things thats just oh so ridiculous for so many reasons. First off, we shouldn’t even be talking about this, because it shouldn’t matter. I mean, she really didn’t even say much – just basically that if they don’t win that we won’t be seeing the last of Sarah Palin.

That said, this is a little bit like your favorite team talking about the trades they’re going to make in the post season – while playing in the championship game. A week before the election, and she finds it necessary to explain what’ll happen if McCain isn’t successful in his White House bid? We here at MNP just think that shit’s cold – and we’re Obama supporters.

Also, the irony here is just killing me. McCain picks Palin as his running mate, in order to stir up the base and hopefully lead to a Republican victory – essentially using her, as we all know this guy had no intention of picking her himself [Where's his buddy Lieberman at?]. So she rallies the base at the convention, gets the crowd chanting and pumping their fists…and we all fully expect her to fall back into the #2 position. But oh no, this shit has been all about her since then – so much so that it might as well be Palin/McCain, and supporters already have Palin 2012 signs. And now she’s making it known she’ll be around in 2012, essentially saying ‘thanks, but no thanks’ to McCain’s White House bid to nowhere. Wow. And I thought Romney was a snake for what he said about MA after being governor.

So Democrats, I hope you’re taking notes [and maybe TIVO-ing this mess] for the 2012 elections – because if Obama wins, she’s going to be jockeying for position in those Republican primaries. A point to exploit if she makes it to the top of the ticket? She couldn’t even be trusted by the McCain campaign – which pulled her from absolute obscurity and shoved her into the limelight. If she can’t even be trusted by the running mate that made her into a national figure, how can anyone trust her to be the President?

Where Does the VP Belong?

nickanderson_3branches.jpg

[Image: “Three branches of government” by Nick Anderson, via]

Article I of the Constitution, which describes the authority of the legislative branch, says that “the vice president of the United States shall be president of the Senate, but shall have no vote, unless they be equally divided.” Aside from the job of replacing a president who dies or is unable to serve, the only vice presidential duties that are spelled out in the Constitution are legislative in character.

But if the vice president is a legislative official, then the exercise of executive power by the vice president raises important constitutional questions related to the separation of powers. The Supreme Court has held on more than one occasion that legislative officials cannot exercise executive power. The Court would likely dub this a “political question” that is beyond its purview, but Congress is empowered to remedy this sort of thing by legislation.

And Congress should do just that: pass a law to prohibit the vice president from exercising executive power. Extensive vice presidential involvement in the executive branch — the role enjoyed by Dick Cheney and Al Gore — is not only unconstitutional, but also a bad idea.

The most important function of a vice president is to serve as a spare president. Using the spare president in the ordinary course of business is as unwise as driving on one’s spare tire. Spares should be kept pristine, for when they are really needed.

.:Where Does the Vice President Belong? OP-ED -> via The NY Times

McCain is a Socialist Too

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2JPbQOHEkY[/youtube]

This here is why so many independents and democrats supported McCain on 2000 – because his head wasn’t lodged all the way up his own ass…

McCain 2000 should be brought to the present to debate McCain ’08 – and maybe team up with Obama to kick his own future-ass, and slap Palin.

Note: Yes, this rich white b*tch actually brings up slavery because her daddy has to pay taxes. Wow – poor form.