A Dozen : The Glue Society

This week MNP got a chance to talk with Jonathan Kneebone of the Glue Society. We talk about their particular brand of "creative collective" - which is a group of writers, directors and designers. Enjoy the interview.

pile

Pile

How was the Glue Society formed?

The Glue Society was started in 1998 in Sydney. Gary Freedman and myself wanted to create a set-up which was essentially creative through and through. Where we could make ideas happen. And make a living doing what we love doing. We knew that once we had created some work, then that would attract future customers. Fortunately for us the first projects we undertook were very diverse. A rebranding exercise for Channel V - a local music TV channel. A logo design for Hong Kong Tourism. Which combined with an art book we had made for News Limited in a previous existence to create a very broad output. And the work has always been what has brought in the next project.

How many people/what type of artisans are involved with the collective?

We have a total of nine writers, designers, film directors and artists in the studios here in Sydney and New York.

Where do the members reside?

The majority of us work from Sydney. With Gary Freedman heading up New York. We do move around as the work requires. And have spent a fair amount of time working in New Zealand, Thailand, Europe and the States.

IMG_5988 copy 2

Whippy

What aspects of your organization do you feel are unique?

The approach to work is still very different. We are unusual in that we bring together idea and execution into the same creative space. And that approach has allows us to work in an extremely versatile way. Our art projects co-exist with commercial projects. And each of us has a hand in both.

How do you separate the various specialties of the Glue Society?

We work with each other in different pairings or groups - depending on the project at hand. We don’t have specialities as such. But as each person has their own creative ambitions - and desires to achieve new things - the dynamic of the group and what it produces does evolve and change. Currently, we are working on a television project which is bringing together all of the team in some capacity, for example.

What is most important to you do you think in preserving a collective’s life (or half-life)?

The important thing is to allow everyone to be involved in evolving the creative output. And of course to have a shared creative ambition.

Glue-Society-Chair-ArchLR

Chair Arch

How does your website engage the public while offering a base to the collective?

We felt that our website should be a simple gallery of our work. It has our ‘mark’ if you like. And it does invite conversation. Soon, we will be allowing people to buy some of our work.

What has been your most difficult project?

Inherently, I think we make all our projects challenging - so that we evolve. In any given period, every one of us will be doing something we haven’t done before. Recently, for example, we buried a 25 tonne digger in 300 tonnes of sand in a park in Denmark. It is not something anyone has done before. But therein lies the attraction.

How do you find inspiration?

Not knowing the answer more often than not provides the inspiration.

amber2

Amber Relic

Where do you see the Glue Society in the next ten years?

We hope to be doing things we would never have thought we were capable of. And to allow everyone involved a chance to have the ability to live where they want to live and do more of what they want to do. That was the mission from day one.

MosesLR

Moses

:: all images courtesy of Jonathan Kneebone of the Glue Society ::

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: August 21st, 2009
at 7:16am by Koookiecrumbles

Tagged with ,


Categories: contemporary,a dozen

Comments: 1 comment



 

One Response to 'A Dozen : The Glue Society'

Subscribe to comments with RSS or TrackBack to 'A Dozen : The Glue Society'.

  1. […] The Glue Society :: Continue on to the interview-> Share this: […]

    | myninjaplease

    29 Dec 09 at 2:26 pm

     


 

Leave a Reply