The Early Men of Science

Image source

Those who think of the 21st century as a headily unprecedented rush of innovation should pause to consider the first half of the 19th. Between 1800 and 1860, the world gained a giddy array of inventions, including the battery, the electric light, the steam engine, electromagnets, typewriters, sewing machines, dynamos, photography, propellers, revolvers, postage stamps, bicycles and the internal combustion engine. In the book "The Philosophical Breakfast Club", Laura J Snyder deftly recreates this age of marvels through the lives of four remarkable Victorian men. In doing so, she tells a greater tale of the rise of science as a formal discipline, and the triumph of evidence-based methods of inductive reason.

: Continue reading the article :

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: March 22nd, 2011
at 10:38pm by mnp


Categories: science,philosophy,innovation

Comments: No comments



 

Leave a Reply