Archive for February, 2011

Frustration because of a lack of freedom or control can be the best motivation. If you channel that frustration into a personal project that could eventually (even if just possibly) help you gain your freedom, you'll find yourself enormously more productive than you would be otherwise. We all hit that wall on our personal projects that makes it hard to continue and stay motivated. Feelings of doubt and frustration have killed more projects and businesses than we could ever possibly know.

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 1st, 2011
at 7:32pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: the column

Comments: No comments


In fact, this may be the real reason why upgrading a dependency is such a dangerous thing to do. It doesn’t trigger the alarm bells that it should because it seems so boring. I’ve noticed that anyone who has been writing production software for a significant length of time has learned to flinch away from upgrades the way you would flinch from putting your hand on a stove that might be hot.

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 1st, 2011
at 5:47pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: the column

Comments: No comments


Search innovation will continue for years to come. Local and Mobile search have lots of possibilities for innovation that leverage location awareness, personal preferences, and social network inputs. Based on these signals search results could include relevant coupons, offers, and advertising. Mobile phones will have better voice search, QR code and bar code recognition, and utilize the camera for things like Google Goggles search, and many more innovations.

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 1st, 2011
at 5:16pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: the column

Comments: No comments


Do Technologies Ever Die?

My favorite NPR guy, Robert Krulwich, posted this interesting article today asking whether or not technologies ever really die out. His point was that it seems like there is no technology ever created on earth that is no longer being used/produced in some form. This obviously can’t be completely true, but it IS mostly true. Although the entire article might be a plug for his friend’s book, I still recommend it.

Nothing? I asked. Brass helmets? Detachable shirt collars? Chariot wheels?

Nothing, he said.

Can’t be, I told him. Tools do hang around, but some must go extinct.

If only because of the hubris a the absolute nature of the claim a I told him it would take me a half hour to find a tool, an invention that is no longer being made anywhere by anybody.

Go ahead, he said. Try.

If you listen to our Morning Edition debate, I tried carbon paper (still being made), steam powered car engine parts (still being made), Paleolithic hammers (still being made), 6 pages of agricultural tools from an 1895 Montgomery Ward & Co. Catalogue (every one of them still being made), and to my utter astonishment, I couldn’t find a provable example of an technology that has disappeared completely. (Source)

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 1st, 2011
at 4:33pm by Black Ock

Tagged with , ,


Categories: weaponry,science

Comments: No comments


The Ice Book (HD)

The Ice Book is a miniature theatre show, a pop-up book that comes to life as if by magic.AIt tells the story of a mysterious princess who lures a boy into her magical world to warm her heart of ice. It is made from sheets of paper and light, designed to give a live audience an intimate and immersive experience of film, theatre, dance, mime and animation.

.:theicebook.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 1st, 2011
at 3:36pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: art,film

Comments: No comments


At present, taking the "fully formalized and machine checked" option adds massive overhead to a verification effort. This is a problem because the systems that we want to verify are getting larger and more complicated each year. Advances in modularity and proof techniques are needed, and appear to be coming.

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 1st, 2011
at 12:16pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: the column

Comments: No comments


But what makes it even harder is that software scalability is a relatively new challenge, something only really done in big companies, companies that are not really keen on sharing their knowledge. The amount of academic work done on software design is quite limited compared to other types of design, but shared knowledge about scalable design is almost nonexistent.

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 1st, 2011
at 12:11pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: the column

Comments: No comments


Conductor: MTA String Instrument

Conductor turns the New York subway system into an interactive string instrument. Using the MTA’s actual subway schedule, the piece begins in realtime by spawning trains which departed in the last minute, then continues accelerating through a 24 hour loop. The visuals are based on Massimo Vignelli’s 1972 diagram.

.:mta.me->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 1st, 2011
at 12:04pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: music,maps

Comments: No comments


…rofl

Is there anything to really say about this? No you just have to watch it.

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: February 1st, 2011
at 11:46am by Black Ock


Categories: ninjas are everyehere

Comments: No comments