Archive for May, 2008

Douglas Fogle: a€oeLife on Marsa€A

barrymcgeemnp.jpg

Can you elaborate on the Life on Mars theme? Ita€™s a reference to a song on the David Bowie album a€oeHunky Dorey.a€A Can you explain the metaphor aspect of that?

FOGLE: The title of the exhibition came much later than the actual show started developing. In 112 years, the show has never had a title other than The Carnegie International. And I really wanted to start the exhibition before you walked in the door, so I wanted something that was evocative without closing down, meaning that it opened up questions before you walked in the door. I have always been a big David Bowie fan, and the song a€oeLife on Mars,a€A which is on the a€oeHunky Doreya€A album that he did I think in a€71 or a€72, ita€™s a song that really talks about kind of a world spinning out of control and about a€" he longingly asked the question, a€oeis there life on Mars?a€A For me, thinking about other worlds, thinking about what contemporary art does, it takes you to other worlds. Therea€™s a sense of the relevancy of [the David Bowie song a€oeLife on Marsa€A] for today, given the unmoored nature of the global sort of world that we live in, political events, cultural events, and whatnot. So it seemed like and apt title to give, and an evocative title to give to an exhibition that was about 40 contemporary artists from all over the world.

The lyrics express a desire for humans to connect with each other, with another world?

FOGLE: Yes. I wouldna€™t put too much stock in it a€" I dona€™t want the title to lock down and clamp down on the artists in a way. It is a metaphor. Ita€™s just kind of what I just said, which I think, for me, ita€™s a metaphor of thinking about other worlds, thinking about utopian places, thinking about a human longing for connection or for escape, either way. So for me it really is a way, just a very loose framework on which to hang a€" to get someone in the door thinking about the exhibition before they see the show.

blackandwhiteprogram

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 22nd, 2008
at 7:23am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: music,art,film,architecture,photo,design,contemporary

Comments: No comments


Foto del dia 5.22

englishtaxismnp.jpg

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 22nd, 2008
at 5:19am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: foto del dia

Comments: No comments


The Graffiti of the Philanthropic Class

bookertwashingtonmnp.jpg

That’s what the New York Times, via an article today by theater critic Charles Isherwood, calls the various plaques and signs honoring philanthropists’ donations to cultural venues, schools, hospitals, charities, libraries, parks, museums, etc.

With his personal interest focused on performing arts, Isherwood concentrates primarily on the "naming" of theatrical venues; but the implications of his lede line: "WHATEVER happened to Anonymous?" include the many other instances in which benefactors are identified by name.

One can only wonder if the Times’s resentment of the practice might stem in some small part from the curious absence of the name Sulzberger on any local buildings or public facilities. Certainly, there are no hospital wings, university labs, concert halls, or charitable organizations widely known for affiliation with the Sulzbergers — even in the weekly Sunday Styles pages of the family’s own newspaper, a reader would be hard pressed to see any photo of Pinch or pAAre among the attendees at charity balls, galas, and fundraisers. Which makes it unlikley that he and his family are anonymous donors.

Indeed, as far as a quick mental review by this lifelong New Yorker extends, there is no recollection of any public involvement of the Sulzbergers — certainly one of the city’s premier business dynasties — in any philanthropic endeavors save one. That’s the Times’s annual "Neediest Cases" drive, in which readers are asked to donate money for which the Times later takes credit by turning the funds over to various organized charities.

In a city where names from Andrew Carnegie to more recent philanthropists like Weill, Rose, Paley, Tisch, and many others are firmly attached to the walls and canopies of so many public structures, would it be so terrible if the Times’s Isherwood stopped whining so loudly about the recognition given to public-spirited citizens and spent his energy entreating his boss to become one of them?

americanthinker

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Nineteen-Ninety-Now #3

YouTube Preview Image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 21st, 2008
at 11:58am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: youtube,music

Comments: No comments


Whip of the week

jalopymnp.jpg

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 21st, 2008
at 11:56am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: whips

Comments: No comments


How the West was Won

YouTube Preview Image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 21st, 2008
at 11:52am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: youtube,music

Comments: No comments


Buyer plans to expand Island papaya exports

papayamnp.jpg

A California-based company plans to expand Hawai’i papaya exports following a purchase of tropical fruit packing and processing facilities on the Big Island.

Santa Paula, Calif.-based Calavo Growers Inc. yesterday announced that it has bought papaya and tropical food processing businesses Hawaiian Sweet Inc. and Hawaii Pride LLC.

Calavo said the purchase price depends on business performance goals achieved over the next year, but is between $10 million and $14 million.

The sale includes the state’s only commercial produce irradiator, an operation selling papaya and guava puree, and about 3,000 acres of Big Island land (including 725 acres of fee-simple property) used by farmers to produce papaya for packing and distribution by Hawaiian Sweet.

The irradiator is used to kill fruit flies and other pests on fruits and vegetables before they are exported.

The businesses being acquired by Calavo process an estimated 65 percent to 70 percent of all Hawai’i papaya, or about 200,000 pounds a week, which is exported to the Mainland.

Calavo said it intends to invest in and increase papaya processing.

"We possess sufficient capacity in the acquired packing houses to ratchet up volumes substantially as we work to expand the revenue base in the category," Arthur Bruno, Calavo’s chief operating officer, said in a statement.

Calavo is buying the Big Island businesses from Lee E. Cole, Calavo’s chairman, president and CEO. The company said the deal was approved with independent oversight by the company’s board of directors.

Previously, Calavo sold papaya processed and exported by the two Hawai’i companies, earning a commission on sales.

Calavo is primarily a marketer of fresh and processed avocados, and reported sales of $303 million in the past fiscal year, ended Oct. 31.

The company was founded in 1924 as a cooperative of avocado growers, and in 2002 converted from a nonprofit co-op to a for-profit company with stock shares traded on the Nasdaq stock market.

Recently, Calavo has been expanding its role in the tropical produce business. In December, the company began marketing Maui Gold fresh pineapples grown by Maui Land & Pineapple Co. under an agreement.

Calavo has marketed and sold Hawai’i papaya since 1949.

Cole has served on Calavo’s board since 1982 and was named president and CEO in 1999. He acquired Hawaiian Sweet in the early 1990s.

The other Cole firm, Hawaii Pride, built an electronic-beam irradiator in Kea’au in 2000 that treats papaya, other tropical fruits and sweet potatoes for export.

honoluluadvertiser

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 21st, 2008
at 11:38am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: business,grub

Comments: No comments


World Wide Cake

triasmnp.jpg

Parking lots in Manhattan are sitting ducks. Every inch of open concrete seems doomed to end up disappearing under a glimmering tower of real estate. But when the lot on the corner of Lafayette and Canal was transformed recently, it was, surprisingly, broken up into small, street-level retail stalls rather than luxury condos.

A wooden frame houses the stalls, which have locking gates and semi-permanent looking walls, and the entranceway, painted to look like a Chinese temple, has a speaker affixed to its back, blasting Chinese pop. The sign reads "Little Chinatown." For the most part, this urban strip mall consists of familiar Chinatown farea€"the Louis Vuitton bags have Ps mixed in to the monogram, and Prada has been reincarnated as "Pagoda."

But those who live and work near this intersection have discovered the real score in Little Chinatowna€"hot, bite-size, custard-filled cakes that seem poised to become a local addiction. A sign describes them as "The Best and World Wide Cake," and I’d have to agree to that sentiment. The cakes are football shaped, but corn-themed. Though there’s no cornmeal in the batter, each cake has a relief of an ear of corn on its surface, wrapped in its own husk like fat babies in tiny sleeping bags.

Watching them emerge from a miniature factory is the kind of thing that would stick in a kid’s mind as magic, like watching cotton candy being spun at a fair. First a thin battera€"similar to one you would use to make wafflesa€"is pumped into tiny little molds, then thick, eggy custard is added to the center. Once both sides are browned, an apathetic teenager removes the cakes and places them in a second machine. This one rotates, snapping up the cakes one-by-one, and disgorging them, pristinely wrapped in plastic that immediately fogs with steam but is sturdy enough not to melt.

Despite the neat packaging, the cakes are best eaten fresh. The outside is slightly crisp and the custard is hot, sugary, and almost liquid. The owner, Q. Choi, is the first to open an American location of the Korean franchise, presently called DeliManjoo, but soon to be renamed SAC Delights. "Most people want a more American name," he explained. He plans to expand with many more locations, but also more shapes and flavors, like red bean and chocolate, and more sophisticated machinery.

Choi can instruct you on re-heating the delights in the microwave, which is good to know, even if the results are inferior, in the unlikely event that you and your friends will have trouble finishing 12 cakes ($3) on the spot.

villagevoice

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 21st, 2008
at 11:32am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: business,grub

Comments: No comments


Bioluminescent Creatures and Dinoflagellate Locales

dinoflagellatemnp.jpg

Not long before Curious Expeditions came to Eastern Europe to search for the wondrous and macabre, we had the opportunity to travel through Puerto Rico. It was a magical trip filled with rain forests, the gigantic SETI radio telescope in Aricebo, and the landing port of Ponce de Leon. However, one experience shines above the rest. On the island of Vieques, in a dense mangrove swamp is one of the most magical places we has ever had the pleasure to visit.

We had come on a moonless night and the stars shone down as perfect pinpoints. It was a cool summer night when we slipped into the warm, dark water. (Actually I less a€oeslippeda€A and more fell face first out of my kayak into the salty bay.) As we glided into the water, our faces were suddenly bathed in an eerie, otherworldly green. Brilliant plumes of translucent green swirled all about our limbs making us glow. The light wasna€™t coming from above, but was radiating from all around us. From the water itself.

YouTube Preview Image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook