Archive for April, 2007

19 Nov 05 PROJECT: History, L.A.

lab launches history. history launches lab. the concept is simple. based on a fundamental understanding of what is serial. what could be serial and changing it. yet, trying to create the specifics of any potentially stock image and using those established characteristics for something a little soulful. a little dry. a little redundant. beat skipping and breaking. the image as the riff. the beat or rhythm of the riff. the repetition. a perpetual claim to the right to space. to advertise. and maybe betray a past I know, but only through the present, and things are different, this is history.

welcometolab

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: April 9th, 2007
at 10:53am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: art

Comments: No comments


peter max in mao defintion

maomag

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: April 9th, 2007
at 10:32am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: art

Comments: No comments


Hydrology vs. the Apocalypse

389630883_48ce601a59_o.jpg

But here’s what could possibly be the most interesting trivia:
The world’s dams have shifted so much weight that geophysicists believe they have slightly altered the speed of the earth’s rotation, the tilt of its axis, and the shape of its gravitational field.

To repeat: altered the speed of the earth’s rotation.

Slightly, that is. But even if the alteration amounts to a mere fraction of a second per day, that dams could shorten or lengthen a year obviously offers a possible solution to a perennial nuisance: earth-bound extinction level asteroids.

In other words, would a hydrological meganetwork of dams hasten the planet’s solar orbital journey such that we arrive at the impact point in space and then depart before the asteroid has even arrived?

pruned.blogspot

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: April 9th, 2007
at 10:22am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: green,architecture,fo' real?

Comments: No comments


mess hall economics

messhall

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: April 8th, 2007
at 5:13pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: myninjaplease,life,web,business,weaponry

Comments: No comments


a€oethird-culture kida€A

An article in the FT by John Lanchester this week-end dealt with the notion of a€oethird-culture kida€A: children who accompany their parents when they went to live in countries other than their own and then become hybrid (taking elements of the a€oehomea€A culture from which their parents came and the culture of the place in which they were being brought up). The authors then use this as a metaphor for other purposes.

Roots are for trees. That was once a distinctly leftwing argument: the idea was that the political right had a vested interest in people staying, geographically and psychologically, in their place. When, during the second world war, General de Gaulle approached the philosopher Simone Weil to write down her ideas about the future of France, she called the resulting book Enracinement a€" Rootedness (though the English translation, a little plonkingly, calls it The Need for Roots). Her ideas were seen as conservative, expressing a nostalgia for a world in which people did not move from where their feet were firmly planted in the soil. When T.S. Eliot argued against a€oerootless cosmopolitansa€A a€" in his lexicon, a code phrase for Jews a€" he was making a similar point. People should be where they are from.

Now, curiously, the politics of rootedness seem to have reversed. It is the left that argues for protection from the forces of modernity, for the importance of the local, while the right argues that mobility and transience are simply unavoidable conditions of modern economic reality. The slogans of globalisation are a€oeget on your bikea€A and a€oethe world is flata€A. People who want to get on have to be willing to move, often and unhesitatingly, at the behest of their employer or to seek work.

ft via tecfa.unige

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: April 8th, 2007
at 5:13pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: life,mnp is for the children

Comments: No comments


knitting

Striking workers picket. Anti-war protesters rally and march. But lately, activists are turning to a new mantra-a€oeknit, purl and cast off.a€A

Once the preserve of little old grannies, knitting is re-emerging as a hip hobby. Fresh recruits are collaborating with experienced knitters to find a new function for this centuries-old craft: using knitted accessories to make political statements about everything from sweatshop labor and abortion to the Iraq war.

These protest organizers say knitting is a natural outlet for expressing political views.

a€oeKnitting has opened up activism for a lot of people,a€A said Gary Neufeld, founder of the Revolutionary Knitting Circle in Calgary, Canada. The circle started in 2002, when members staged a a€oeknit-ina€A in front of Calgarya€™s financial office buildings during the summit of G-8 industrialized nations.

jscms.jrn.columbia

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: April 8th, 2007
at 2:10pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: clothes,politricks,weaponry

Comments: No comments


skovby petal

padstyle

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: April 7th, 2007
at 11:46am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: home,design

Comments: 2 comments


eat local: Our guide to subscription farms.

botanicall.JPG

HEADLINES TOUT ORGANICS as the fastest-growing sector in agriculture, but with high-volume stores like Wal-Mart and Target getting in on the game, demand is outpacing supply. It’s entirely likely that store shelves marked "organic" are filled with produce from industrial farms or China, Mexico, and other foreign sources, rather than the small-scale regional family farms the label conjures.

Along with farmers’ markets, the best way to support the little guy remains community-supported agriculture, or CSAs, through which you can buy a "share" in local independent farms. In exchange you get weekly deliveries of seasonal fruits and veggies throughout the summer and into the fall; orders typically range from half to three-quarters of a bushel. Most farms encourage members to volunteer on the premises as well, which is a good way to learn how your food is grown and develop an appreciation for how it gets to your dinner table. Some CSAs listed below are USDA-certified organic (or currently wending their way through the three-year certification process), but most use undocumented organic growing methods described as "sustainable." Most don’t deliver directly to your home, instead using neighborhood drop-off points that include farmers’ markets, businesses, or private homes. (Neighborhoods are picked based on demand, so speak up if yours isn’t listed and maybe it will be.) Some farms that follow may augment their harvest with food from other producers; we’ve also included a few providers, like Home Grown Wisconsin, that consolidate products from multiple local sources.

Read the rest of this entry »

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: April 6th, 2007
at 2:04pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: green,grub

Comments: 1 comment


crankup charger

Spotted on Treehugger , another combination flashlight and crankup charger for cell phones.

Other hand-cranked devices to recharge mobile phones:

Emergency Flashlight Recharges Cell Phones - Electrilite Emergency is a new hand-cranked emergency flashlight with a built in FM radio, an alarm and an outlet to recharge cell phones.

Sony’s Hand-Cranked Radio Has Light, Can Charge Cell Phone - Sony Corp. has taken the wraps off a hand-cranked emergency AM/FM radio that can also serve as a flashlight and comes with an attachment for charging a cellular phone.

Hand crank Motorola Phone Project - The Motorola PVOT designed by Andre Minoli is intended as a lower tier phone for developping latin American countries. Designed to operate on rechargeable AA batteries. It is charged via a hand crank.

Sidewinder Charger - A hand-cranked charger that needs no other power source. Two minutes of winding will give you six minutes of talk time but you can keep cranking until your hand gives out or you lose interest in the conversation.

GoGoPower Wind-Up Device Charges Mobile Phones - Made by Japanese technology company Fuso Rikaseihin, it’s a a wind-up mobile phone charger which gives you an extra 20 minutes of power. It takes 5 minutes to wind it up though.

textually

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: April 6th, 2007
at 9:37am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: green,cell phones

Comments: No comments