Archive for the ‘blogs’ Category

Happy Towel and Geek Day!

Image source

And hey, 57 percent of Americans consider it a compliment to be called a geek, says a survey by the information technology staffing company Modis. Still, more self-identified geeks were more comfortable being labeled a geek than a nerd.

Geek Day also coincides with Towel Day, when fans of the late author Douglas Adams carry a towel in his honor. In "Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy," Adams makes it clear that a towel is all you really need to be prepared for whatever the galaxy can throw at you. An excerpt:

"A towel is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can have. Partly it has great practical value. You can wrap it around you for warmth as you bound across the cold moons of Jaglan Beta; you can lie on it on the brilliant marble-sanded beaches of Santraginus V, inhaling the heady sea vapors … you can wave your towel in emergencies as a distress signal, and of course dry yourself off with it if it still seems to be clean enough."

.:blog.syracuse.com->

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 25th, 2011
at 4:46pm by mnp


Categories: myninjaplease,blogs

Comments: No comments


Crowdsourced Gardening

Bhut Jolokia, the hottest pepper plant known to man at over 1 million Scoville units, is also one of the hardest to grow.  However, in John Gordon’s basement, the Bhuts have a carefully tuned environment controlled by automated heaters, watering pumps, fans, and lights.  The system is all controlled by an Arduino and the data is sent to Pachube for monitoring (John likes to make sure the Bhuts are safe and sound when he’s at work).

: Continue reading :

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 25th, 2011
at 4:04pm by mnp


Categories: weaponry,grub,development,blogs,innovation

Comments: No comments


If It Walks Like an Entrepreneur…

Click here to learn more.

Image source

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 25th, 2011
at 1:14pm by mnp


Categories: blogs,entrepreneurship

Comments: No comments


Most of Your Work Sucks

In the ten or so years I’ve been shooting photos, I cannot tell you how many I’ve taken.  Not because the number is so staggeringly large (it’s probably under 100,000) but because I’ve deleted so many I have no way to keep an accurate tally anymore.  If you were to look through the ones that I’ve deemed "good enough" to keep, you’d probably say that most of them sucked.  This culling process is one of the reasons there are only 85 photographs on my website, spread across 5 different categories.  Still, looking at that site now, with nearly a year between today and my last significant photography project, I could easily cut half the shots featured there.

But, that’s the nature of creative work.  Nobody produces all masterpieces.  In a medium like photography, creating great work means producing a lot of work.  When Ansel Adams was still a full time professional landscape photographer, he used to say he was doing great if he got 12 significant images per year.  In a medium like writing, creating great work means not only producing a lot of work, but doing even more editing.  Honing ideas, stories, scenes, and phrases until they are as good as they can reasonably be.  Even though most of your output may suck, with enough refinement, you can eventually produce something fantastic.

.:ajkesslerblog.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 21st, 2011
at 10:55am by mnp


Categories: myninjaplease,life,art,too good to be true,weaponry,photo,development,blogs

Comments: No comments


Who is Tony Wheeler?

Image source

Tony Wheeler, the co-founder of Lonely Planet. The story of Tony and his wife Maureen beginning Lonely Planet is an incredible story. It begins in 1972 when, for their honeymoon, Tony and Maureen traveled from London, across Europe, through Asia and eventually found themselves in Sydney. When they arrived in Sydney they were asked so many questions about their journey they decided to take their notes, add some research and turn it into to a book. As they say, the rest is history. (Source)

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 16th, 2011
at 6:24pm by mnp


Categories: travel,blogs,who is?

Comments: No comments


The Tech Community’s Diversity Problem

Image source

Take gender diversity, for one thing. By most counts, the average open source project has 49 male participants for every female participant. Women at conferences - rare enough already! - are assumed to be significant others, designers or visitors from planet marketing, with disastrous consequences for all involved.

This is a problem, for lots of reasons. The worst is that it’s self-perpetuating - women will (wisely!) avoid hostile environments, and through some broken-window-like mechanism, environments without women will quickly become environments that are hostile to women. (The same holds for other visible minorities.)

In discussions about "how to fix this", community leaders often appear to be at a loss, unsure how to progress. Their early efforts are often met by criticism on both sides - techies have a strong libertarian streak that tilts at all sorts of windmills, and the women who do "blaze trails" aren’t always much better than the men. (In fields like physics, chemistry and finance - fields dominated by men for ages - which are, these days, however, beating our numbers by a wide margin - the first generation of women to brave the hostilities and pierce the glass ceiling are often later generations’ harshest critics. "What? You want to have a career and a family? I didn’t have that option. Why should you? You’ll need to learn to drink scotch and smoke cigars like I did, or you’re through.")

: Continue reading :

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

AiOP and The New School presents: URBAN FESTIVAL

Art in Odd Places (AiOP) and The University-wide Urban Curriculum at The New School is pleased to announce the 2nd annualUrban Festival commemorating the bicentennial anniversary of the 1811 Commissioners’ Grid of Manhattan. A partnership between Art in Odd Placesand urban@newschool, this event will celebrate and imagine the future of the grid. The Commissioners’ Grid began at 14th Street, the first street in the grid to span from the Hudson to the East Rivers. Professional and amateur performers, as well as artists will offer a condensed a two-hour event beginning at sunset on 14th Street between Fifth and Seventh Avenues. This event is free and open to the public.

.:artinoddplaces.blogspot.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: April 28th, 2011
at 6:17pm by mnp


Categories: art,events,blogs

Comments: No comments


5 Kinds of Bloggers

.:iluvempire.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Manor Economics : Digital Peasants

Image source

The Huffington Post sale has caused some "digital peasants" to become restless:

The same writers who were happy to contribute for free before the sale are now accusing the publication of turning them into "modern-day slaves on Arianna Huffington’s plantation." The suit claims that about 9,000 people wrote for the Huffington Post on an unpaid basis, and it argues that their writings helped contribute about a third of the sale value of the site. These bloggers weren’t paid a single penny in the sale—the money went mostly to Huffington and a few investors.

.:iftf.org->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: April 27th, 2011
at 2:01pm by mnp


Categories: web,business,"ninja",et cetera,development,blogs

Comments: No comments