Archive for the ‘walk the earf’ Category

Walk the Earf : Japan’s Sunflowers

Four months after the Fukushima power plant disaster, Japan is asking volunteers to grow sunflowers to help decontaminate radioactive soil. (Source)

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: July 25th, 2011
at 7:40pm by mnp


Categories: walk the earf

Comments: No comments


Walk the Earf : Paris Metro

The Paris Metro and the service it provides are deeply intertwined into the fabric of the city. As the 4.5 million Parisians who ride it every day will probably attest it’s the quickest way around whether it’s for work, for play or both. The metro’s distinctive art-nouveau style is unmistakable and the plant like green wrought iron entrances topped with the orange orbs and Metropolitan signage designed byAHector Guimard which sprout up all over the city lead one down to the gleaming white tiled platforms to be whisked away all over the city. On my first trip to Paris I arrived into Gare du Nord and entered the dense maze that is the metro. Despite the crowds, the noise and the distinct odour of piss, I was in love. The kind of love which inspires one to risk life, limb and deportation to get up close and personal.

.:sleepycity.net->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: December 26th, 2010
at 3:12pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: walk the earf

Comments: No comments


Walk the Earf : Nohoch Nah Chich

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: December 16th, 2010
at 12:32pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: walk the earf

Comments: No comments


Walk the Earf : Earth as Art

Earth is truly beautiful whenAviewed from space. But add some false color produced by satellite sensors, and the result is stunning.

The U.S. Geological Survey has released a new selection of particularly interesting images from the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites. These space craft have been prolific sources of data for earth scientist, but the new shots were chosen solely based on aesthetics.

We’ve selected our favorites from the USGS’AEarth as Art collection in this gallery, which will take you on a tour of the world from the glaciers of Antarctica to the deserts of Algeria.

Images and captions courtesy USGS.

.:wired.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 18th, 2010
at 3:06am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: art,walk the earf,maps

Comments: No comments


Walk the Earf : Panama Viejo

A walk teaches you a lot about an area. AThe sounds, structures and people always speak if you listen. ASometimes, a bit more than you're comfortable with. AA recent walk in Panama City, Panama really got to me. ADaunting poverty next to unrivaled wealth, fine dining next to slums, pleasant nature budding to blown out speakers.

: Continue reading :

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 10th, 2010
at 8:06pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: walk the earf

Comments: No comments


Walk the Earf : San Bartolo

In March of 2001 archaeologist William Saturno found himself deep in the jungle of northern Guatemala, a two-day journey from civilization, without food or water. He was standing in what had once been a plaza at San Bartolo, a largely unexplored Mayan ruin. The plaza had been reclaimed by the jungle over the past thousand years, and was distinguishable from its surroundings only by the presence of several steep, vegetation-covered mounds on its periphery. The largest of these mounds was an 80-foot-high pyramid, consumed by earth, vines, and trees, that stood on one side of the plaza. As he approached the pyramid Saturno noticed a fresh trench crudely sliced into the side of the structure by looters. Dehydrated and exhausted, he entered the looters' trench, trying to escape the oppressive 90-degree heat and dense jungle air. The trench led to the base of the pyramid where the looters had continued on, digging a tunnel into the pyramid's center. Saturno followed the tunnel to a small, dark room, which had been backfilled with rubble almost two millennia ago. Turning on his flashlight he passed the beam across a section of exposed wall illuminating the stern features of the Mayan maize god rendered in brilliant crimson paint. Other paintings appeared to stretch around the entire room, but most of them were obscured by rubble. It was a mural. In fact, it was the oldest intact Mayan mural archaeologists have ever discovered. It was a big deal.

: Continue reading the article :

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: November 5th, 2010
at 10:48pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: walk the earf

Comments: No comments


Walk the Earf : Caristales

The river, world famous for itsAcolorfulAdisplay, has been called:"the river that ran away to paradise," "the most beautiful river in the world" and "the river of five colors".

DuringAColombiaA‘s wet season, the water flows fast and deep, obscuring the bottom of the river and denying the mosses and algae that call the river home the sun that they need. During the dry season there is not enough water to support the dazzling array of life in the river. But during a brief span between the wet and dry seasons, when the water level is just right, the many varieties of algae and moss bloom in a dazzlingAdisplayAof colours. Blotches of amarillo , blue, green, black and red - and a thousand shades in between - coat the river.

.:funzug.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: August 13th, 2010
at 7:59pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: walk the earf

Comments: No comments


Walk the Earf : Andreas Rutkauskas

.:projex-mtl.com->

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: July 23rd, 2010
at 6:35pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: photo,walk the earf

Comments: No comments


Bisti : MNP Walks the Earfs

bisti.jpg

Would you expect to find a duck-billed dinosaur in the desert? Well, welcome to the Bisti Wilderness. The barren and seemimgly lifeless landscape found today is vastly different than the swampy lush vegetation in which huge dinosaurs roamed millions of years ago.

bisti2.jpg

As the inland seas retreated to the north, the coastal swamps and succeeding forest parks and meadowlands of northwest New Mexico disappeared under the advancing river flood plains. Within these sediments lie the buried remains of the rich animal life that lived there. Ancient animal life is represented by isolated teeth and bones of fish, turtles, lizards, mammals, and dinosaurs, who at their zenith dominated the other life forms. These treasures of the past await explorers willing to brave this badlands wilderness.

bisti5.jpg

This 3946 acre area is now known as the Bisti Wilderness. It was designated by Congress in the San Juan Basin Wilderness Protection Act of 1984. Bisti, translated from the Navajo language, means badlands and is commonly pronounced (Bis-tie) in English and (Bis-ta-hi) in the Navajo language. [LINK]

bisti3.jpg

Approach Roads: Five miles along the entrance track, the grassy plain is replaced quite abruptly by a multi-colored eroded landscape of small clayish hills, shallow ravines, and strange rock formations. The scene is a vivid mixture of red, grey, orange and brown that stretches for many miles. The track passes a large area suitable for parking, then crosses a dry sandy wash and continues alongside the badlands for ca 3 miles before rejoining NM 371. However, the road was fenced off shortly after the wash when I visited, a barrier which looked quite permanent. The far end of the track is actually the official entrance to the badlands, not that there is much difference in scenery or facilities. Several similar un-signposted tracks cross the sandy hills at the south edge of the formations, around a seasonal drainage known as the De-na-zin Wash. A ten mile drive along one such bumpy track leads to the much larger De-na-zin wilderness equally colorful and even more remote, although partially covered with vegetation. [LINK]

bistibw.jpg

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: December 20th, 2009
at 3:34am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: walk the earf

Comments: 1 comment