Archive for the ‘hood status’ Category

‘Bullet proof hoodie’ condemned by gun groups

bulletproofmnp.png

Gun control groups have condemned a new a€oebullet-proof hoodiea€A which claims to protect against street violence.

The A£300 Defender hoodie makes the wearera€™s upper body invincible to every bullet up to a high velocity rifle, its makers claim.

It was developed by Bladerunner, a London based company which also makes stab-proof tops.

Barry Samms, the owner, said that a mother from Walthamstow, East London, had asked for the Defender after her son had been mugged three times.

a€oeOur current customers range from undercover police officers to concerned parents,a€A he said.

But gun control groups said today that the company was practising a€oeexploitation at its most grotesquea€A. They predicted a rise in gang violence, saying children would buy the hoodie as a status symbol.

Raymond Stevenson, a spokesman for Dona€™t Trigger, an international anti-gun campaign based in Brixton, London, said: a€oeIta€™s not helping kids to provide them with bullet-proof armoury. These companies are just encouraging the escalation of the urban warfare.

a€oeIta€™ll give people the false impression that theya€™re protected and will encourage more aggressive behaviour.a€A

The hoodie weighs one kilo, only slightly more than a normal version. It can be bought with the Bladerunner logo a€" but without it there is no indication of its capabilities.

Mr Samms denied his firm was targeting teenage gang members with the invention. a€oeIta€™s only a hoodie because you cana€™t really put a zip across the front of something bullet-proof,a€A he said.

a€oeAdults wear hoodies too. My mum wears one and you dona€™t see her hanging out on street corners.a€A

But Adrian Davies, a partner in the company, admitted that the item could encourage people to become involved in crime.

a€oeWe dona€™t want to be arming gangs,a€A he told Times Online. a€oeBut we cana€™t investigate everyone who places an order.a€A

Mr Davies said that Bladerunner had received more than 100 emails this morning from people asking about the hoodie. a€oeOur websitea€™s had 3000 hits just on that product,a€A he said.

The hoodie is currently in the prototype stage, but will be on sale in the next four to six weeks, Mr Davies said.

Last week Gordon Brown was forced to defend Harriet Harman, the Deputy Labour Party Leader, after she wore body armour to tour her South London constituency. Ms Harman claimed she did so as "a matter of courtesy", and compared it to wearing a hard hat while visiting a building site or a hair net in a meat factory.

timesonline

email

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 21st, 2008
at 11:14am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: hood status,myninjaplease,too good to be true,clothes,mnp is for the children,weaponry,walk the earf

Comments: No comments


Are we sending the right message to ET?

ninjakillmanimnp.jpg

It’s midnight on a far-flung planet and some alien astronomers happen to have their radio telescopes pointed right at Earth, when they get a tiny spike in RF power - it’s a message! Quick, decode it. What’s it say?

It’s . . . it’s . . . an advertisement for Doritos. Beamed across the cosmos. On purpose.

No joke. Doritos’ latest effort will see the UK public trying to come up with the winning 30-second spot that evidently will represent humanity’s first interstellar ad campaign. With that universal fame, the winner will collect the tidy sum of 20,000 GBP.

In June, the ad will be broadcast using the high frequency radar telescope at the EISCAT Space Centre in Svalbard, Norway. It’ll be aimed toward the "habitable zone" around one of the stars in the Ursa Major constellation, one of our best candidates for an untapped populace of snack food consumers.

But it’s 42 light years away. By the time they get the message and pop over, just think of all the Doritos flavours there will be.

OK, OK, so everybody loves a good PR stunt. Admittedly it could be more enticing than the heady stuff we’ve been pumping out until now, or nothing at all. And I’m as compulsive a Doritos eater as the next guy (or the next seagull).

But we are, conceivably, talking about the first impression we are going to make on an alien population. Couldn’t we advertise something more representative of our cultures, our hopes and dreams and interplanetary worthiness? Like Spam? Corn dogs? Help me out here. After June the marketing floodgates shall be open forever - what do you think we should be pitching to the universe at large?

Jason Palmer, New Scientist intern
(Mashup by danp)

newscientist

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

How to make a kite

kiteninjamnp.jpg

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 7th, 2008
at 1:45pm by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: hood status,games,weaponry,design,boredom killer,diy

Comments: No comments


Masaaki Hatsumi - Soke : Rule 7

ninjarule7mnp.jpg

The tradition of the Bujinkan recognizes nature and the universality of all human life, and is aware of that which flows naturally between the two parts:

a€¢"The secret principle of Taijutsu is to know the foundations of peace.

a€¢To study is the path to the immovable heart (fudoshin)."

bujinkan via ninjadynasty

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Kidnapped in Gaza

More than most journos, the BBCa€™s Alan Johnston has had his close-up with the imbalance between Israeli fortunes and those of the Palestinians.

But the reporter, who refused to cover Gaza from the comfy confines of Tel Aviv or Jerusalem or, worse still, rely on Al Jazeera footage, was also the subject of a real-life drama few TV thrillers could match.

One day in March 2007, Johnston was snatched from his car by a shadowy band of kidnappers belonging to the Army of Islam and was kept in a three-month captivity that had the world on the edge of its seat.

Johnstona€™s appearance in Toronto Wednesday, April 30, at a gathering hosted by Canadian Journalists for Free Expression was his thank-you to supporters here who joined others around the planet to press for his safe release.

a€oeIt was one of the most moving things I have ever known,a€A says a gracious Johnston on the phone from London, where he now works in the relatively safe environs of Bush House, home of BBC World Service radio. a€oeSo many people stood up for me. It was extraordinary.a€A

But nowhere was the support more generous than in Gaza itself, where not only Palestinian journalists but also the citizenry turned out day after day to demand the release of the only Western journalist who had told their story while living among them.

As well as a kidnap drama, Johnstona€™s story is about the limits of knowing in a place as complicated as Gaza, even for someone who lives there 24/7. And in a perverse irony, the only Western journalist in the Palestinian enclave had to follow the most significant development in the Palestinian struggle since the death of Yasser Arafat with the rest of us on BBC World Service radio.

Wea€™re talking about that night in June of last year when Hamas pulled off a military putsch that sent Fatah packing from Gaza. Lying in his bedroom jail, Johnston tried to follow events, listening to the fiercest bombardment hea€™d heard in a place where a nighttime symphony of small-arms fire is as normal as the sound of crickets.

It was the Hamas takeover that inevitably set the stage for Johnstona€™s release.

a€oeHamas delivered the knockout blow, and the first thing they said was that they would free me,a€A Johnston recalls. But was he a step closer to freedom or to death?

Soon after Hamas announced its intentions, his kidnappers decked him out in an explosives-filled suicide jacket and paraded him before TV cameras as a warning of what would happen if Hamas or anyone else tried to spring him. a€oeI was worried that in any rescue I might not make it,a€A Johnston recalls.

But Hamas did prevail, and its prize was having its Gaza chief bring a freed Johnston before a relieved press corps, a public relations victory that allowed the organization to show that Fatah lawlessness was history and the Palestinian territory was under new management.

Although his three-year stint reporting in Gaza ended with a bang, Johnston had otherwise been in sync with his neighbours.

a€oeLiving a Gazan experience, I was there for every Israeli raid and I was under every Israeli sonic boom, just like the Gazans,a€A Johnston says.

BBC listeners will remember Johnstona€™s distinctive voice a€" higher-pitched than the standard broadcast bass a€" and his on-the-ground reporting of what passes for ordinary life there.

a€oeI tried to cover the conflict in a way that people can relate to,a€A he says. a€oeGaza is more than a conflict. There are people studying, starting careers, opening shops, getting married and having kids. Theya€™re making their way in an extraordinary setting.a€A

Perhaps ita€™s because he has this unique vantage point that he offers as much equivocation as journalistic certainty. He admits, for example, that there was much that eluded him about Gazan politics, even after breathing its air for so long.

a€oeI always found it quite hard to understand the factions within Hamas,a€A which, like any political outfit, is filled with hard-liners and moderates, the former now in the ascendancy.

Then there are those rockets fired regularly from northern Gaza into southern Israel. Is that the work of Hamas? I ask him.

a€oeIt often wasna€™t directly Hamas,a€A he says. a€oeIt was more likely Islamic Jihad or occasionally and somewhat ironically the Al Aqsa Brigades, which are aligned with Fataha€A a€" Israela€™s supposed partners in peace.

a€oeIta€™s important to say the rocket fire is feeble and usually does little damage,a€A Johnston says, a€oethough ita€™s meant to kill, especially when it involves the bombardment of urban areas. But to focus only on the rocket fire is not useful in understanding the desperate need to find a political solution to a problem.a€A

As Johnston points out, a€oeEighty per cent of the residents of Gaza are refugees who are embittered by the loss of Jaffa,a€A the Arab settlement thata€™s now an artsy suburb of Tel Aviv, an hour up the Mediterranean coast.

As well as posing a political challenge, Gaza poses a moral one. a€oeOne people has a state, one does not,a€A Johnston says. a€oeOne people is occupied, the other is not.a€A

Parachute journalists shy away from that part of the story. Johnston couldna€™t, because he lived it. via

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 6th, 2008
at 11:24am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: hood status,apple,politricks,fo' real?,9th dan,et cetera

Comments: No comments


Quote[s] of the day

Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I’m not sure about the universe.

[W]hen people thought the Earth was flat, they were wrong. When people thought the Earth was spherical they were wrong. But if you think that thinking the Earth is spherical is just as wrong as thinking the Earth is flat, then your view is wronger than both of them put together.

via

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 6th, 2008
at 10:36am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: hood status,myninjaplease,life,web,robots,politricks,weaponry,architecture,design,science

Comments: No comments


Nigerian Boxing

Competitors crouch down in a ready stance, extending their free, unwrapped hand out as far as their opponent will allow.

The idea is to test your reach, and tempt your opponent to make a move, and maybe leave himself open.

The boxers can stare at each other in this pose for what seems like minutes before striking.

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 5th, 2008
at 9:15am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: hood status,myninjaplease,games,fo' real?

Comments: 1 comment


Cookin’ with Coolio #5

YouTube Preview Image

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 5th, 2008
at 8:30am by Black Ock


Categories: hood status,green,grub,fo' real?

Comments: No comments


Where is Kevin Bacon?

kevinbaconmnp.png

Post to Twitter Post to Facebook

Posted: May 2nd, 2008
at 9:40am by Koookiecrumbles


Categories: hood status,myninjaplease,life,celebrity,web,business,mnp is for the children,real life news,9th dan

Comments: No comments